Hello! I've a question please...thanks inadvance :)

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Re: Hello! I've a question please...thanks inadvance :)

Postby Solitude » Sun Jun 16, 2013 8:07 am

Thanks...miss...I...ll..try..to..do...it...:)
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Re: Hello! I've a question please...thanks inadvance :)

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jun 16, 2013 10:04 am

Thanks ,probably that's helpfull realy I'll try to follow your instructions and many thanks!
good luck!!!
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Re: Hello! I've a question please...thanks inadvance :)

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jun 16, 2013 11:05 am

hi ladymac, I am not the best when it comes to calorie counting. but I would say the diet I outlined above would suit someone with a moderate activity level. I find it's a good idea to limit the amount of cheese and nuts, and keep meat servings to a reasonable size. also I make my own salad dressing, typically just oil vinegar herbs and spices.

I have been out of commission lately due to injury so to compensate I am not eating so much as that myself. my weight is holding, perhaps I am even losing a little, even though I am currently much more sedentary than is normal for me. for the last two months I have been working to stick to two meals per day (late morning hearty breakfast, early evening lighter supper) instead of three, plus healthy snacks in between.
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Re: Hello! I've a question please...thanks inadvance :)

Postby want2bike » Sun Jun 16, 2013 2:01 pm

Dr. Bergman explain why you have MS and what you can do to get your health back. Young people shouldn't be sick. The China study gives and explanation as to why we have sick people.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGmyUppmt-g

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5g6EPHLF ... re=related
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Re: Hello! I've a question please...thanks inadvance :)

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Jun 18, 2013 4:20 am

here are some foods you can try to eat more of:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tnam ... nt&dbid=75
"Only two of our WHFoods qualify as an excellent source of magnesium - spinach and Swiss chard. But joining them as very good sources are four additional vegetables (collard greens, turnip greens, mustard greens, and green beans) ...
Top legumes for magnesium are navy beans, tempeh (fermented soybeans), pinto beans, lima beans, and kidney beans.
The top nuts and seeds for magnesium are pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, cashews, and almonds.
Halibut is a fish that makes it into our top 10 magnesium foods, as is the sweetener blackstrap molasses. ...
spelt, buckwheat, brown rice, quinoa, and millet also rank in our top 25 magnesium foods."

if you can't work these into your diet in an effective way, you could try taking one (or two) of these per day in addition to a magnesium-rich diet:

http://www.iherb.com/Kirkman-Labs-Magne ... ules/43215

also, here is a study (not the best design, sorry) linking magnesium deficit cravings (basically, the point is this: if you get enough magnesium you may feel less anxiety, and have fewer food cravings).

Rapid recovery from major depression using magnesium treatment
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 7706001034
"Major depression is a mood disorder characterized by a sense of inadequacy, despondency, decreased activity, pessimism, anhedonia and sadness where these symptoms severely disrupt and adversely affect the person’s life... Magnesium deficiency is well known to produce neuropathologies. Only 16% of the magnesium found in whole wheat remains in refined flour, and magnesium has been removed from most drinking water supplies, setting a stage for human magnesium deficiency. ... Magnesium treatment is hypothesized to be effective in treating major depression resulting from intraneuronal magnesium deficits. These magnesium ion neuronal deficits may be induced by stress hormones, excessive dietary calcium as well as dietary deficiencies of magnesium. Case histories are presented showing rapid recovery (less than 7 days) from major depression using 125–300 mg of magnesium (as glycinate and taurinate) with each meal and at bedtime. Magnesium was found usually effective for treatment of depression in general use. Related and accompanying mental illnesses in these case histories including traumatic brain injury, headache, suicidal ideation, anxiety, irritability, insomnia, postpartum depression, cocaine, alcohol and tobacco abuse, hypersensitivity to calcium, short-term memory loss and IQ loss were also benefited. Dietary deficiencies of magnesium, coupled with excess calcium and stress may cause many cases of other related symptoms including agitation, anxiety, irritability, confusion, asthenia, sleeplessness, headache, delirium, hallucinations and hyperexcitability, with each of these having been previously documented. The possibility that magnesium deficiency is the cause of most major depression and related mental health problems including IQ loss and addiction is enormously important to public health and is recommended for immediate further study. ...A 40-year old man, irritable, anxious, extremely talkative, moderately depressed, and heavily into use of food, tobacco (smoking and chewing), alcohol and cocaine, took 125 mg of magnesium (as taurinate) with each meal and at bedtime in an effort to relieve his symptoms. ... The 40-year old man found himself free of his symptoms within a week, and unexpectedly found his craving for smoking, dipping, cocaine and alcohol to disappear also. It seemed that magnesium deficiency caused his habituation. He also noted that his ravenous appetite was suppressed, and beneficial and desired weight loss ensued."
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