What is the connection between 'MS' and Mitochondria

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What is the connection between 'MS' and Mitochondria

Postby NZer1 » Fri Jul 05, 2013 1:46 pm

What is the connection between diseases like 'MS' and Mitochondrial functions?

Is this a relationship of the dysregulation or dysfunction of the Mitochondria because of the environmental toxins and endo-toxins disrupting the Heme process which causes the secondary porphyria cascade (even more serious toxins) that leads to progressive symptoms and then disabilities?

It would appear that many if not most degenerative diseases are linked to Mitochondrial ATP production issues. Is the main cause of the ATP production disruption the incomplete 8 stage heme process and the additional toxins that occur?

Many researchers have a variety of theories why MS occurs and they list co-incidences or co-factors and yet they are unable to find a main link to join all the co-incidences. The list is long from Vascular to Diet and just as broad with Infection to Latitude. When I studied the papers I could find on infections such as Lyme and CPn mimicking MS, or vice-versa the link to Mitochondria production and Mitochondria dysfunction showed a cascade path of events that fitted MS symptoms because of the heme production disruption by secondary porphyria caused by these bacterial forms.

If environmental toxins for instance and bacterial endo-toxins (as the bacterial cells die) are producing health problems across the board it would also appear to link the secondary porphyria to the cause of a cascade form of disease progression, degenerative disease.

My personal experiences of being treated for CPn infection/MS have fitted hand in glove with the Mitochondria/porpyhria/symptoms link.

One of the reasons why I ask this question about Mitochondria and porphyria is because I found this piece of knowledge and it's link to degenerative disease and specifically MS; Pathogenesis of Porphyria.

Both neurological and gastrointestinal symptoms are thought to result from neuronal dysfunction. Histological findings in peripheral and autonomic nerves include oedema, irregularity of the myelin sheaths, thinned and irregular axons, axonal vacuolisation, and degeneration and cellular infiltration.'8 Electrophysiology shows muscle denervation and decreased motor nerve conduction velocities.'9 The pathogenesis of the cerebral manifestations, however, remains unclear. The main hypotheses are metabolic abnormalities, ischaemia, demyelination, and oxidative stress. Pathology of the CNS includes vacuolisation of neurons, focal perivascular demyelination, and reactive glial roliferation.40 Unfortunately, postmortem pathological findings bear little relation to the clinical features in life, supporting the theory that many of the clinical features may be caused by profound metabolic abnormalities.
http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/62/4/319.full.pdf

:)
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Re: What is the connection between 'MS' and Mitochondria

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Jul 05, 2013 2:24 pm

throwing this in the mix
Mineral and vitamin deficiencies can accelerate the mitochondrial decay of aging.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16102804
Abstract
Mitochondrial oxidative decay, which is a major contributor to aging, is accelerated by many common micronutrient deficiencies. One major mechanism is inhibition of the pathway of heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, which causes a deficit of heme-a. ... We emphasize those deficiencies, which appear to cause damage through this mechanism, particularly minerals such as iron (25% of menstruating women ingest <50% of the RDA) or zinc (10% of the population ingest <50% of the RDA). Several vitamin deficiencies, such as biotin or pantothenic acid, also increase mitochondrial oxidants through this mechanism. Additionally, other minerals such as magnesium and manganese that play a role in mitochondrial metabolism, but do not affect heme directly, are discussed. An optimum intake of micronutrients could tune up metabolism and give a marked increase in health, particularly for the poor, elderly, and obese, at little cost.
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Re: What is the connection between 'MS' and Mitochondria

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Jul 05, 2013 2:26 pm

one of the ways mag plays with mitochondria (can't make it display a png image so here's the link instead)
http://maxcelint.com/NaturalHealthDirec ... onEdit.png
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Re: What is the connection between 'MS' and Mitochondria

Postby NZer1 » Fri Jul 05, 2013 3:46 pm

Great image Ms Legs,
I wish they would be able to add the deficiencies and the bacteria and other disruptions to the image as well! The perfect scenario always makes everything look so calm and placid!

:)
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Re: What is the connection between 'MS' and Mitochondria

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Jul 05, 2013 3:57 pm

hmm you tempt me to see what I can do... >:P
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