dysphagia

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dysphagia

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Mar 04, 2007 5:45 pm

what do you guys think? over the last few months i started noticing that things would tend to go down the wrong way. it was ticking me off. i hadn't been supplementing. had largely cut out bread to try to help deal with suspected candida issues, and also was off grains and some legumes as a low carb idea. my throat kept getting worse. last week it got so bad i was coughing every 5 seconds trying to clear my airway coz every bit of fluid wanted to go down the wrong way. i decided maybe magnesium was the problem, cause magnesium is needed for muscle control, and looked up high magnesium food sources and it's mostly cereal, which i don't eat, then grains (which i was avoiding), nuts, (i don't eat nuts or peanut butter), and so on, so then i said okay i'll high dose magnesium and see what happens, need to take calcium and d3 with that, check, okay here goes. so for only two days, thurs/fri, i took two cal-mag-zinc pills and a 1000IU D3. yesterday and earlier today i was fine. but i didn't supplement yesterday and today, and this evening i am back to clearing my throat a lot. i am going to take a big dose of magnesium (with calcium and D3 again) this eve and all this week to see if it stays away this time. an interesting little experiment.
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Postby TwistedHelix » Mon Mar 05, 2007 7:49 am

Hey Jimmylegs,

Dysphagia can, of course, be a direct symptom of many neurological conditions including MS so, as all the drug packets say, "If symptoms persist, consult your doctor". Having said that, it sounds to me as if you've done the right thing -- magnesium deficiency does cause dysphagia, which can disappear within 24 hours of supplementation, but I'm not sure how quickly symptoms can come back once you stop -- as you said, an interesting experiment. It's just a shame that so many of us feel we have to resort to experimenting on ourselves -- whether it's through diet, supplements, or other regimens -- in a desperate search for something which helps.

If I'd wanted to be a guinea pig I'd chew up newspaper and crap in the corner of my living room, but there you go.... quick, someone, pass me the Times... :)

Dom.
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throat/jimmylegs/balance

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Mar 05, 2007 8:26 am

fortunately i don't mind experimenting on myself, it's just finding the balance and not holding to one plan for too long. i wouldn't have this magnesium problem if i hadn't gone overboard on the candida ideas when my skin was in trouble! (which it seems to have resolved now so i can start getting back into the breads again now i guess!) anyway thanks for backing me up there, TH, and yea i had no idea how easily it would come back either. but you know it has occurred to me that when my jimmylegs originally went away, i was largely working on vitamin D supplementation, which in my case automatically came with calcium and magnesium. when i dropped off with the supplementation, the jimmylegs came back. and now the throat is getting in on the action. so, back to supplements for me :S

ciao!

d
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Postby thinkingoutloud86 » Mon Mar 05, 2007 11:29 am

hi j-legs,

sorry to hear that you're dealing with that...it sounds uncomfortable...i wish i had some suggestions, but i don't have a lot of knowledge about this topic...in fact, after reading your post, i'm left wondering if i may have something similar...for the past seven or eight years (i had my attack in 2004), i've had a problem of coughing when i lie down in bed...not to sound too gross, but it is as if i cough on my own saliva...from what you know and experience, does that sound like a similar thing?

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Postby jimmylegs » Mon Mar 05, 2007 11:48 am

TOL, i don't think that's gross at all, and yes it's EXACTLY the same thing, weird that it would only affect you when prone, though. do you feel that it's gradually progressing over time?

do you already supplement with magnesium though? and do you eat cereals and grains regularly? if you do, i think the only way you could get low enough in mg to affect muscle (e.g. epiglottis in this case) function, i think, would be too much coffee and alcohol.

also you get a fair amount of magnesium and calcium in tap or mineral water, but if you use a brita filter you can strip out the good minerals that your body expects to obtain from drinking water.

FYI magnesium is required not only for proper immune system function but also for biochemical reactions in heart pumping - that was an interesting aside i ran across while investigating some cardiac arrhythmia info for my brother.

that's all for now, any more questions or comments, fire away :)
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dysphagia

Postby gabelle » Mon Mar 05, 2007 2:57 pm

Jimmylegs, If your problem persist, have it checked by MD. My swallowing problem turned out to be thyroid related (benign cyst/nodule).
I have had no luck with any treatment so far and I am interested in what you have done R/T diet and vitamins. I looked back at earlier post, but unable to find answers. Did you have the food allergy test done or were you just eliminating foods to see if it helped? My symptoms have steadily worsened with each treatment tried and so now I am looking for other avenues tp pursue. Any suggestions appreciated..
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thyroid stuff

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Mar 05, 2007 3:09 pm

hey there, gabelle, sorry to hear about your throat, it is a pain isn't it. i was just easing off on a group of foods, not from a test but because i suspected some candida problems which were highlighted by an open rash which wouldn't go away for a year but seem to have eased off finally in the last couple of weeks. i'm not 100% sure it's gone for good but my fingers are crossed. anyway from a dietary measures standpoint i definitely overdid the food restrictions. i took my magnesium cocktail last night and again today, and the throat problem has backed off again. so i'll keep it up this week for sure. i will look into the thyroid thing for you and see if i can come up with any suggestions. can you describe the swallowing problem in detail? did you just feel like you had a frog in your throat? i was worried at first that i had some kind of tumour or something!

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Postby jimmylegs » Mon Mar 05, 2007 4:01 pm

okay it's turning out a little off what i expected but still very interestingly interconnected and cool.

first i just did a general search and read this:
Cystic Thyroid Nodules: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Dilemmas.
Endocrinologist. 12(3):185-198, May/June 2002.
Massoll, Nicole M.D. *; Nizam, M. Soubhi M.D. +; Mazzaferri, Ernest L. M.D., M.A.C.P. ++
Abstract:
Cystic thyroid nodules are common, comprising as many as 40% of thyroid nodules encountered by the endocrinologist. Their differential diagnosis is relatively broad and includes lesions that may not fit a stereotypical presentation, such as intrathyroidal thyroglossal duct cysts, branchial cleft cysts that are close to the midline, and cystic lesions that are malignant. Benign cystic thyroid nodules not infrequently present with symptoms and signs that mimic an aggressive thyroid cancer, including pressure symptoms and rapid growth; however, a cystic papillary thyroid carcinoma may provide few clues of its malignant nature, including a soft consistency to palpation and little or no apparent growth over the course of several years. The physical and biochemical features of the aspirated fluid of a nodule provide little diagnostic information; both benign and malignant lesions may yield grossly bloody aspirates or translucent yellow fluid. Cystic thyroid nodules not only have a higher than usual likelihood of yielding cytology specimens that are inadequate for diagnosis but also have higher than usual rates of false-negative cytology specimens. However, using a careful clinical assessment, ultrasonography, Doppler studies and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy, the malignant or benign nature of most cystic thyroid nodules can be identified. This article reviews the differential diagnosis, diagnostic approach, and treatment of cystic nodules.


then i decided to search on thyroid nodules and cholecalciferol and came up with this link:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fc ... tion.43218

it's more of a cancer article but with the autoimmune linkages, sure okay i'd give it a once-over, and when you search the page for cholecalciferol, it goes to this sentence:

Hypomagnesemia also inhibits formation of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 (1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol).


now this i find extremely interesting because we know 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 provides brakes for the immune system similiar to what the interferon drugs try to imitate. we also know that the third trimester of pregnancy is protective against ms and that serum levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 more than doubles during that final trimester. so if magnesium is a limiting factor for 1,25 production, well then we'd all be smart to make sure we have not just calcium to go with our D3 supplement, but magnesium also. which we knew already but this adds another layer of rationale for me, so neat.

now back to thyroid nodes and nutrition... bbs!

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Postby thinkingoutloud86 » Mon Mar 05, 2007 11:17 pm

hey legs-

thanks for the info...you've given me something to think about...how i deal with this "lovely disease" is still a work in process and i'm still tweaking things...i'll be sure to run more questions if i have them...also, if i am ever able to be an assistance, please let me know

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Postby jimmylegs » Tue Mar 06, 2007 6:18 am

hey no probs and thanks TOL :)

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Postby gabelle » Tue Mar 06, 2007 7:27 pm

In my case, I began to have difficulty swallowing and did notice an enlargement in my throat area. I ask them for years to check my thyroid level for weight gain problems and each time my blood serum levels would be fine. When we checked at this time, again the blood test were normal and it was only when we did the ultrasound/iodine levels that the abnormality showed up. The surgeon said if he did a needle biopsy, he might miss the spot and if it was cancer we would miss it and that is why we did the partial thyroidectomy. I am not an expert on the suggested vitamin suppliments and will read more on what you have commented about. Thank you all for your support. By the way, I have had (4) Tysabri infusions with worsening symptoms and have decided to stop the Tysabri also.
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Postby jimmylegs » Tue Mar 06, 2007 8:05 pm

well i think this ties in nicely with something i was working on in a completely different post so here it is again:

http://www.lef.org/protocols/metabolic_health/thyroid_regulation_01.htm

The thyroid gland uses iodine (mostly available from the diet in foods such as seafood, bread, and salt) to produce thyroid hormones. The two most important thyroid hormones are thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). While a small amount of T3 is actually made in the thyroid gland, most of it is converted in the tissues from the T4 released from the thyroid gland into the blood. T3 is the active hormone that affects the metabolism of cells.

Subclinical hypothyroidism is estimated to occur in a significant percentage of the adult American population (Hollowell JG et al 2002). One side effect of thyroid deficiency is high cholesterol. It is very possible that many people are being prescribed cholesterol-lowering statin drugs while their underlying problem—low thyroid function—goes unaddressed.

The most common cause of overt hypothyroidism in the United States is an autoimmune disorder known as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (Lorini R et al 2003). This condition is characterized by an overactive immune system response that floods the thyroid gland with white blood cells that attack the gland. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is more common in women than in men, and there is a genetic component to the disease.

There is evidence that the standard blood test reference ranges may cause many cases of hypothyroidism to be missed. (legs edit: big suprise!!) The standard reference range for TSH is between 0.2 and 5.5 mU/L. Any reading more than 5.5 mU/L would signal low thyroid hormone and possible hypothyroidism. Unfortunately, this TSH reference range is very broad. Many clinicians and scientists believe that the upper limit of the established “normal” range is too high to permit detection of people with significantly low thyroid function.

In reality, a TSH reading of more than 2.0 may indicate lower-than-optimal thyroid hormone levels.


Okay as we all know when I hear autoimmune I say vitamin D so perhaps try that, in addition to some good iodine foods to give that thyroid what it needs to do its job!
and of course i would add to blend the D3 with calcium and magnesium so that everything holds hands and plays nicely together.
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