Uncle was just diagnosed

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Uncle was just diagnosed

Postby alikat » Sat Mar 26, 2011 10:45 am

My uncle is 66 yrs old and has advanced diabetes. He was just diagnosed with MS and was told he should consider chemotherapy and radiation to treat. Can anyone please give me insight on how this helps or what other options there are? He is a stubborn man and is already considering against it. I am a cancer survivor, I've been through chemo and radiation and i know how bad it was for me at 26 yrs old to get through. I'm very worried about him and want to hear from any of you with the same experience. I hope to find someone else with Diabetes that can relate and possibly offer some firm advice or words from experience.

thank you for any words in advance. THis is very scary for us all.

-Alikat
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Postby lyndacarol » Sat Mar 26, 2011 12:37 pm

I do not share your uncle's situation – I was diagnosed at age 32 with MS, do not have diabetes, have never had chemo or radiation; I have quite different ideas about MS from most other people. I suspect that excess insulin plays a big role in MS. With that belief, I suspect that your uncle has type II diabetes, which also has elevated insulin levels. I encouraged him to ask his doctor for a "fasting serum insulin test" – this is not the same as a glucose test. For the insulin test, a result above 7 UU/ML is elevated.

Since I no longer believe that MS is "an autoimmune disease," I no longer take any of the injectable MS drugs designed for autoimmunity. (Through the years I have tried three of them, but never saw a benefit. In fact, the side effects were intolerable.)

I think the greatest improvement can be achieved with a no carb (or at least very low-carb) diet. Carbohydrates are not necessary for a healthy diet; they convert to glucose (blood sugar) in the bloodstream and trigger insulin production. Low-carb veggies, such as kale, Swiss chard, broccoli, etc., are acceptable, but not the starchy vegetables. Protein and fats are vital to the diet – vitamins are made from the amino acids in them, fat is even necessary for the insulation for the nerves, which are targeted in MS.

Google. "Dr. Terry Wahls" and read about her great success overcoming MS with diet and exercise.

Best wishes to your uncle.
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