all things vitamin D

Discuss herbal therapies, vitamins and minerals, bee stings, etc. here

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Feb 11, 2008 10:54 am

short answer, yes. long answer:

http://www.postgradmed.com/issues/2004/04_04/inzucchi.htm
The average adult human body contains about 1 kg of calcium, 99% of which resides in the skeleton in the form of hydroxyapatite and 1% of which is found in soft tissues and the extracellular space. Since calcium plays a critical role in neuromuscular function, blood coagulation, and intracellular signaling, circulating calcium concentrations are maintained within a very tight physiologic range (about 9 to 10 mg/dL [2.25 to 2.5 mmol/L]).


Ionized calcium concentration is closely regulated by two separate but related hormone systems: parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)2D3), or calcitriol.


http://www.springerlink.com/content/1117r60lk7010l23/
These data suggest that 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol is able to increase bone resorption independently of parathyroid hormone


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_resorption
Bone resorption is the process by which osteoclasts break down bone and release the minerals, resulting in a transfer of calcium from bone fluid to the blood.


so, you take vitamin d3 at high levels, and it releases more calcium from your skeleton. unless it already has some handy in the blood because you supplemented.
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9222
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Advertisement

Postby CureOrBust » Tue Feb 12, 2008 1:06 am

jimmylegs wrote:so, you take vitamin d3 at high levels, and it releases more calcium from your skeleton. unless it already has some handy in the blood because you supplemented.
So those Indian outdoor workers with ludicrously high circulating D3 would be facing a high incidence of osteoporosis?
User avatar
CureOrBust
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2871
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:00 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Feb 12, 2008 9:24 am

it depends on the vitamin D3 assay used, whether the levels are in fact ludicrous, on simultaneous levels of pth and plasma calcium. and other as yet understudied factors such as other minerals.

looks like there's some interesting followup debate to the following abstract which you could have a peek through. i can't spend the time on the debate myself right now :)

Natl Med J India. 2003 Nov-Dec;16(6):298-302.
Comment in:
Natl Med J India. 2003 Nov-Dec;16(6):294-7.
Natl Med J India. 2004 Jan-Feb;17(1):55-6.
Natl Med J India. 2004 Mar-Apr;17(2):114; author reply 114-5.
Bone mineral parameters in healthy young Indian adults with optimal vitamin D availability.

BACKGROUND: Several recent studies indicate a marked prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in asymptomatic, apparently healthy urban subjects from different socioeconomic groups in north India. METHODS: To further examine this trend, we studied 40 men and 50 women, 20-30 years of age, from the Indian paramilitary forces. These individuals consume a nutritious, high-protein diet, have optimal exposure to sunlight and undertake strenuous outdoor physical exercise. RESULTS: The mean serum calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal in both men and women. The mean (SD) serum intact parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels were 19.3 (8.2) pg/ml and 18.4 (5.3) ng/ml in men, and 11.9 (6.6) pg/ml and 25.3 (7.4) ng/ml in women. Bone mineral density estimated in 20 men and 22 women revealed that in comparison with white Caucasians, 35%-50% of men and 14%-32% of women were osteopenic at different sites, while an additional 10% of men had osteoporosis of the lumbar spine. CONCLUSION: We found that with optimal nutrition, good sunlight exposure and regular physical exercise, healthy young individuals have normal bone and mineral biochemical values. The reasons for the abnormalities detected in bone mineral density in them needs further study. The impact of childhood nutrition on accumulation of peak bone mass may contribute to our findings. There is a need for establishing normative bone mineral density data for Indians.
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9222
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Vit D and diabetes

Postby bromley » Thu Mar 13, 2008 3:01 am

User avatar
bromley
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1889
Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2004 3:00 pm

new vitamin D info

Postby Loriyas » Tue Apr 01, 2008 5:15 am

Loriyas
Family Elder
 
Posts: 575
Joined: Sun Apr 02, 2006 3:00 pm
Location: Naples, FL

Postby TwistedHelix » Thu Apr 03, 2008 6:39 am

That's very interesting, Loryas, and if people aren't convinced by that article here's something I just picked up on PubMed:


Use of vitamin D in clinical practice.

Cannell JJ, Hollis BW.

Director, Vitamin D Council. Correspondence address: 9100 San Gregorio Road, Atascadero, CA 93422 Email: jjcannell@gmail.com.

The recent discovery - from a meta-analysis of 18 randomized controlled trials - that supplemental cholecalciferol (vitamin D) significantly reduces all-cause mortality emphasizes the medical, ethical, and legal implications of promptly diagnosing and adequately treating vitamin D deficiency. Not only are such deficiencies common, and probably the rule, vitamin D deficiency is implicated in most of the diseases of civilization. Vitamin D's final metabolic product is a potent, pleiotropic, repair and maintenance, seco-steroid hormone that targets more than 200 human genes in a wide variety of tissues, meaning it has as many mechanisms of action as genes it targets. One of the most important genes vitamin D up-regulates is for cathelicidin, a naturally occurring broad-spectrum antibiotic. Natural vitamin D levels, those found in humans living in a sun-rich environment, are between 40-70 ng per ml, levels obtained by few modern humans. Assessing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH)D) is the only way to make the diagnosis and to assure treatment is adequate and safe. Three treatment modalities exist for vitamin D deficiency: sunlight, artificial ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, and vitamin D3 supplementation. Treatment of vitamin D deficiency in otherwise healthy patients with 2,000-7,000 IU vitamin D per day should be sufficient to maintain year-round 25(OH)D levels between 40-70 ng per mL. In those with serious illnesses associated with vitamin D deficiency, such as cancer, heart disease, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, autism, and a host of other illnesses, doses should be sufficient to maintain year-round 25(OH)D levels between 55 -70 ng per mL. Vitamin D-deficient patients with serious illness should not only be supplemented more aggressively than the well, they should have more frequent monitoring of serum 25(OH)D and serum calcium. Vitamin D should always be adjuvant treatment in patients with serious illnesses and never replace standard treatment. Theoretically, pharmacological doses of vitamin D (2,000 IU per kg per day for three days) may produce enough of the naturally occurring antibiotic cathelicidin to cure common viral respiratory infections, such as influenza and the common cold, but such a theory awaits further science.

PMID: 18377099 [PubMed - in process]
Dom
User avatar
TwistedHelix
Family Elder
 
Posts: 599
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 4:00 pm
Location: Northamptonshire, England.

Postby ssmme » Thu Apr 03, 2008 7:51 am

I am currently in southern Florida visiting my in-laws in West Palm Beach area during Spring Break for my kids. Every time we come down here I wish we would move here but my husband likes to live where it gets cold. These types of articles will help me support my arguments for moving down here. Keep up the good work! :D

Marcia
Marcia
User avatar
ssmme
Family Elder
 
Posts: 350
Joined: Sat Sep 22, 2007 3:00 pm
Location: Lexington, KY

Postby MrsGeorge » Thu Apr 03, 2008 8:23 am

Guess that I will have to move out of England then!
User avatar
MrsGeorge
Family Elder
 
Posts: 334
Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2007 4:00 pm

Postby Loriyas » Thu Apr 03, 2008 8:54 am

Marcia
Do you feel better when you are in Florida? I definitely do, which is why we moved from Ohio. Get your husband to move! You will be glad you did!
Lori
Loriyas
Family Elder
 
Posts: 575
Joined: Sun Apr 02, 2006 3:00 pm
Location: Naples, FL

Postby Artifishual » Thu Apr 03, 2008 11:24 am

The little bit of what we consider cold weather here in Texas hurts me so bad. I don't know how people in the northern areas do it? If the temp get below 60 degs I am looking fo a coat. I go fishing just about every weekend and I feel so much better after a good afternoon in my boat in the sun. It is normally 95 degs here with 100% humidity. The wonderful Gulf breeze! Gotta love it.[/b]
Artifishual
Family Elder
 
Posts: 645
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 4:00 pm

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:36 pm

so being from 'the north' as it were, i am still wondering why i can get such a fierce sunburn on my face in winter, working outdoors as i do, and still not be making vitamin D. i mean, i could look it up i'm sure it's just x and y amounts of energy input needed for pigmentation vs d3 production, but i guess i'm just lazy :)
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9222
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Postby ssmme » Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:37 pm

Do you feel better when you are in Florida?


Yes I do! I can get out of the house and breathe fresh air. I'm from Kentucky and the bone chilling cold winters which spill into April and begin in September make me stiff and uncomfortable. I feel that for 6 or so months out of the year I'm a hermit cooped up in my house. It's not the way I want to live. Any ammunition you can give me to support my position on moving I'll gladly use.

Thanks!
Marcia
Marcia
User avatar
ssmme
Family Elder
 
Posts: 350
Joined: Sat Sep 22, 2007 3:00 pm
Location: Lexington, KY

Postby Artifishual » Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:41 pm

Talking about skin pigmentation. Strange, but I have slightly redish/blonde hair. Normally people with my hair color you would associate with having light colored skin, but in my case I have a dark tan. My neuro is always saying how dark I am for someone with my hair color. For what it worth. arti
Artifishual
Family Elder
 
Posts: 645
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 4:00 pm

Postby Loobie » Thu Apr 03, 2008 3:07 pm

This is fascinating. I take 4000IU per day while my wife and daughter each take 2000 per day. I hope that's enough to shield my little girl from possible MS. I about cried when I read that if it's the father that has it, the offspring are more likely than if it is the mother. I quit putting sunscreen on her years ago. When I was growing up, we would burn the first day, and then we would just be dark brown all summer. Every time I see parents just hammering their kids with 50 SPF every half hour I always want to tell them to back off a bit. Now I think I'll just give them this article!
User avatar
Loobie
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2196
Joined: Mon Sep 11, 2006 3:00 pm
Location: Dayton, Ohio USA

Postby Artifishual » Thu Apr 03, 2008 3:11 pm

I worry about my five year old son. he is sandy blonde with extremely dark skin. his mother is french/coonass. i hope you all know what a coonass is!!!LMAO....arti
Artifishual
Family Elder
 
Posts: 645
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 4:00 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Natural Approach

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users