all things vitamin D

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Is anyone else taking super high Vitamin D doses?

Postby ElMarino » Thu Aug 20, 2009 7:15 am

I just wondered because, of all the do-it-yourself treatments that I've tried (Tryptophan, NAG, B12, I-can't-remember-what-else-over-the-years!) I actually have a very good feeling about this.

You see ever since I was a child I've had eczema. It used to be pretty bad but, with avoiding perfumed soap and detergent it's completrely under control. I've felt it was linked with my MS, during a relapse the eczema was likely to be worst and, besides, they are both auto immune reactions gone wrong, right? Anyway, since reading this article http://www.webmd.com/multiple-sclerosis ... s-relapses mid spring I have been taking 14,000 iU of vitamin D on days when it hasn't been sunny enough to spend 45 minutes on my balcony in the sun. It just so happens that a week ago, for the first time since I was five years old, my eczema has completely dissapeared. I've no idea if it will last but it does make me mildly optimistic.

So, has anybody else been on high vitamin D since the study was published?

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Postby jimmylegs » Thu Aug 20, 2009 8:32 am

hi E, if you go under regimens and read the Orthomolecular etc Mega D thread you can see what i have been doing since 2006 and high-dosing d3. hasn't cleared up all my skin probs yet, but mine are not eczema. it's pretty fun when you hit on something that makes a diff for you, isn't it!
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Postby notasperfectasyou » Thu Aug 20, 2009 8:50 am

Kim is taking D3 8000-9000/day. She got a script from her Neurologist for 50000 once a week, but our farm'acy only had D2 and we wanted D3. So he said it was ok to continue on the ones we get OTC. But, Kim has been on high dose D from even before that. There is a lot of stuff out there on it. Ken
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Postby Mamacita » Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:39 am

My husband only tests his D levels once or twice a year when he goes in to see one of his doctors. He takes 5000 IU/day, and he's usually at around 50ng/ml. That's about 125nanomoles/liter, I think. We're going to try to creep him up a little higher though.

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Postby jimmylegs » Thu Aug 20, 2009 11:06 am

you've got him right in the sweet spot by the sounds of things! but yea i try to go for 150 too.
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Postby MrsGeorge » Thu Aug 20, 2009 12:48 pm

I was but I sopped. I need to start it up again, especially because I have eczema. Thanks for pointing it out!
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Postby notasperfectasyou » Thu Aug 20, 2009 12:53 pm

I don't know if the bumps Kim's had on her face is Eczema, but when she started on ABX, it cleared up. Ken
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Postby Wonderfulworld » Thu Aug 20, 2009 12:59 pm

I am on 4000IU D3 a day.
Two things happened about 5 months after starting the regime.

I stopped having monthly migraines.
My dishydriotic eczema cleared up.

I recently had a flare up but it was mainly sensory symptoms and brain fog and seems to be clearing up without the "take to the bed for a month" routine that it normally takes, this time of year.
I have a good feeling about it too.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Concussus Resurgo
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
RR-MS dx 1998 and Coeliac dx 2003
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tecfidera, Cymbalta, Baclofen.
EPO, Fish Oils, Vitamin D3 2000 IU, Magnesium, Multivitamin/mineral, Co-Enzyme Q10, Probiotics, Milk Thistle, Melatonin.
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Postby turtle_fi » Fri Aug 21, 2009 8:03 am

hmm. maybe this would be worth testing for me too. i have always had dry skin, and especially in young age it was bad. i still easily have skin infections that go on forever (months at least)

diet low-carb which is high in fat helps my skin to be "greased from inside".
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Postby jimmylegs » Fri Aug 21, 2009 9:02 am

ww i'm going to relay that info about d3 helping your migraines, to a friend.

i went looking for other things that happen in the skin besides making d3, when exposed to sunlight. because my d3 status is great but my skin still sucks. so yesterday i learned about fumaric acid. i wonder what the heck else the skin makes when exposed to UV???

anyway, so now i'm sort of wrapped up in fumaric acid, and serum levels of that other metabolite of d3 1,25 dihydroxycholecalciferol, and phosphate and child levels vs adult, renal function, etc etc...
i will let you know if i figure out how to cure my skin too lol

in the meantime, still keeping tabs on the d3. was at the lab yesterday, gave some blood to see if i'm back down in the 100-250 range again, after a month and a half off from d3 supplements (still eating fish though).

ttfn,
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Postby ElMarino » Sat Aug 22, 2009 5:42 am

Thanks JL - I'll read the regimens D3 thread when I have lots of free time, although I did skim through it.

Good luck with the fumaric acid..
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Postby patientx » Sat Aug 22, 2009 4:38 pm

jimmylegs wrote:i went looking for other things that happen in the skin besides making d3, when exposed to sunlight. because my d3 status is great but my skin still sucks. so yesterday i learned about fumaric acid. i wonder what the heck else the skin makes when exposed to UV???

anyway, so now i'm sort of wrapped up in fumaric acid, and serum levels of that other metabolite of d3 1,25 dihydroxycholecalciferol, and phosphate and child levels vs adult, renal function, etc etc...
i will let you know if i figure out how to cure my skin too lol
JL


JL,

This is interesting you mention fumaric acid. One of the drugs in phase III trials right now, BG12, is dimethyl fumarate, an oral fumarate derivative. And another interesting thing, since you mention your skin, is that it was originally developed (or at least used) as a treatment for psoriasis.
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Postby jimmylegs » Sun Aug 23, 2009 7:22 pm

indeeeed lol! the oral form also caused some major kidney problems in a couple of psoriasis sufferers. jury's still out, i guess :( i haven't read enough to understand it yet. i just got a slight handle on the urea cycle and now i have to figure out the citric acid cycle??
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Why Low Vitamin D Raises Heart Disease Risks In Diabetics

Postby Frank » Tue Aug 25, 2009 1:13 am

Treatment: Gilenya since 01/2011, CCSVI both IJV ballooned 09/2010, Tysabri stopped after 24 Infusions and positive JCV antibody test, after LDN, ABX Wheldon Regime for 1 year.
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Vitamin D and the higher incidence of AI diseases in Women

Postby ElMarino » Tue Sep 08, 2009 2:33 pm

http://www.examiner.com/x-16026-Napa-Co ... s-in-women




Vitamin D and the higher incidence of autoimmune diseases in women

It has long been observed that autoimmune diseases like lupus and multiple sclerosis are more common in women than in men. Other related chronic conditions such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and chronic fatigue syndrome are also much more common in women as well. Two research papers published in the upcoming September, 2009 special issue of the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, titled Contemporary Challenges in Autoimmunity, show a possible connection that involves vitamin D and how it is metabolized in the body.

Vitamin D (also called cholecalciferol) is important in both men and women, and at first glance it would seem that it should behave the same way in both sexes. It has no role in sex-specific hormonal regulation like some of the sex hormones, but it has recently been discovered that a special molecule, called a receptor, that binds to one of the forms of vitamin D is more abundant in women than men. The receptor to which vitamin D binds is important in the activation of the innate immune response.

The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is found in the nucleus of certain cells throughout the body. Recently it was discovered that women have more of these receptors, because in addition to all the same kinds of cells shared with men, they also have VDRs in endometrial cells. Endometrial cells, which comprise the lining of the uterus, are cyclical. Therefore, the number of VDRs fluctuates in sync with the menstrual cycle.

The key

1,25-D, also called calcitriol. This is the form of vitamin D that binds to vitamin D receptors (VDRs). Source: Wikipedia.
to how vitamin D plays its part is to understand what the VDR does. When the correct form of vitamin D (a form known as 1,25-D or calcitriol) binds to VDR, VDR then directly causes the expression of over 900 genes to occur. Two of the genes that are turned on produce proteins that are directly responsible for kicking the immune response into active mode. The reason for VDR in the endometrium is that it provides protection against infection for the developing fetus.

Another key to the puzzle has been the growing evidence that bacteria may play a role in the development of autoimmune disease. If so, why wouldn’t women, who have more VDRs, be better off than men? The problem is that bacteria of various kinds can interfere with VDRs and prevent vitamin D from binding. If vitamin is unable to bind, then the immune response is disrupted. Not only is the immune system affected, but thyroid hormone problems can result too.

Although these results do not provide a clear path to treatment, “the potential role of persistent pathogens in autoimmune disease mandates reconsideration of the use of corticosteroids as a first-line treatment for many autoimmune diseases. Corticosteroids effectively reduce the ability of the immune system to respond to pathogens, including persistent microbiota, which is counterproductive to recovery.”

As a result of the dysregulation of VDRs blood levels of the 1,25-D form of vitamin D increase, because less 1,25-D is binding. “Given the potential benefits of serum 1,25-D as a clinical marker both in the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment response, further research is warranted. If elevated levels of 1,25-D continue to be associated with an inflammatory disease state, 1,25-D could be used as a reliable marker of the autoimmune disease process.”

Sources:

Amy D. Proal, Paul J. Albert, and Trevor G. Marshall. 2009. Dysregulation of the Vitamin D Nuclear Receptor May Contribute to the Higher Prevalence of Some Autoimmune Diseases in Women, In Contemporary Challenges in Autoimmunity. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1173: 252–259.

Greg P. Blaney, Paul J. Albert, and Amy D. Proal. 2009. Vitamin D Metabolites as Clinical Markers in Autoimmune and Chronic Disease, In Contemporary Challenges in Autoimmunity. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1173: 384–390
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