all things vitamin D

Discuss herbal therapies, vitamins and minerals, bee stings, etc. here

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Jun 16, 2010 6:56 am

warns of *risk* of overdosing infants if wrong droppers are used.
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 8944
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Advertisement

Postby zap » Wed Jun 16, 2010 7:02 am

yeah, I'm not a parent and I don't really know how common that (dropper vitamins feeding) is, but reckoned that parents who are MS-vit-D-aware (like folks on here) might be prone to giving their kids extra Vitamin D.
User avatar
zap
Family Elder
 
Posts: 326
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2009 3:00 pm

Postby gibbledygook » Wed Jun 16, 2010 8:36 am

Have the FDA conducted double-blind placebo controlled trials in Vitamin D or is it like the units of alcohol recommendations - just made up?
3 years antibiotics, 06/09 bilateral jug stents at C1, 05/11 ballooning of both jug valves, 07/12 stenting of renal vein, azygos & jug valve ballooning,
User avatar
gibbledygook
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1412
Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2005 4:00 pm
Location: London

Vitamin D-- how much? your kids & you

Postby MSdetective » Tue Jun 22, 2010 8:22 pm

My husband was diagnosed 6 months ago. In that time, I have been reading, asking questions and learning. One thing I have yet to resolve is a good answer on giving my daughter D3. Her pediatrician is clueless about MS, much less MS and vitamin D link. The pediatrician says ask the neuro. The neurologist is a terrific MS specialist, perfect for my grown husband, but he admits he knows little about pediatrics, and since technically the child is not his patient, he is a cautious to advise anything.

One thing the pediatrician and I did resolve and agree to was to change her multivitamin to something without iron! (The clueless pediatrician is onboard with CCSVI, lol.) However the vitamin D was left hanging out there.

I see 400 IU is the standard recommended for children. I will do that if nothing else... but should/could I do more?

So, are you giving your children D3? If so, how much?

It sounds like most of you are on D3 supplements yourselves... how much? Husband is on 2000 daily. That seems low for an MS patient compared to what I've read from you all here.

Thanks so much! (Sorry if this is a repeat discussion, I did search the site.)
User avatar
MSdetective
Newbie
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Apr 22, 2010 3:00 pm

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Jun 22, 2010 8:57 pm

hi there and welcome :)
i think you should do more but testing is needed.
the target is 150 nmol/L. or at least 100 nmol/L.
if you need conversion numbers, google 'si units clinical data' (without quotes) and once you're on the page, scroll down to 'vitamin d3' (the 25OH kind)
Last edited by jimmylegs on Fri Jun 25, 2010 2:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 8944
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Postby daverestonvirginia » Wed Jun 23, 2010 6:48 am

MSdetective, I give my children 1,400 iu's a day. They get 400 from a multi-vit and I give them an extra 1000 vit d pill. I take 6,000 iu's a day. I do and have gotten my vit d level checked first every 6 months and now about once a year. I have never gotten the kids checked. I might do that at some point. Dave
User avatar
daverestonvirginia
Family Elder
 
Posts: 179
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2007 3:00 pm
Location: Reston, Virginia

Postby shye » Fri Jun 25, 2010 8:35 am

www.vitamindcouncil.org is great source of info on Vit D
User avatar
shye
Family Elder
 
Posts: 758
Joined: Sun Nov 29, 2009 4:00 pm
Location: NYC

Postby msgator » Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:52 pm

seems to me like the most important time to take Vit. D is while you are pregnant as most prenatals contain either the 400IU or less dose. Although I guess there is some research that says that it slows the diagnosis, if CCSVI is a congenital anomaly by the time we arrive it is too late to correct the problem of missing veins.

jimmylegs, please correct me if I am wrong.

Ann
always look on the bright side of life

Veins opened 10/15/10. RIJV still on the small side. Feeling much better.
User avatar
msgator
Family Elder
 
Posts: 103
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: USA

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Jun 26, 2010 3:07 pm

i would say that everyone probably needs to take it in all the time. with a few exceptions such as the young and pale at the nudist colony. hyperbole? yes.

but still. the amount for each person should be tailored to each individual, based on knowing blood levels and targets.

if i got pregnant i would get a regular test of my D3 level to ensure that my status quo regimen was still keeping my level at the very least above 100nmol/L. if it started to drop below then i would increase my intake.
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 8944
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Postby JenniferF » Sat Jul 03, 2010 9:06 pm

I send my kids to play outside. All year round, many hours. They are homeschooled, so they can get a lot of hours in the sun.

Beyond that, just a standard multivitamin, 400 iu I think, probably 60% of the time on average. (Depends on the spouse remember to put vitamins out before he goes to work.)

That's what we do. Not proposing it based on anything other than my hunch about what is good for my particular kids. I could be wrong.

Jen.
User avatar
JenniferF
Family Member
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2008 3:00 pm

Vitamin D

Postby Hummer » Sun Jul 04, 2010 11:57 am

I am on 4000 IU per day

Brad
User avatar
Hummer
Newbie
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Jul 02, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: Kelowna BC Canada

Postby Absentee » Sun Jul 04, 2010 5:16 pm

my daughters pediatrician recommended one of the kids D drops per day. That is 400 IU. This was after informing him of my condition (MS) and expressing our intent to supplement our babies diet with more D.

As context, I am RRMS and we live in New England.
User avatar
Absentee
Family Member
 
Posts: 75
Joined: Sat Aug 15, 2009 3:00 pm

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:26 pm

i just checked health canada dri tables for vit d3.

AI stands for Adequate Intake (in the absence of sufficient sunlight).
UL is the Upper Limit for daily intakes.

The table shows 2000 IU per day is the upper limit for about everyone, except infants up to one year. for them the upper limit is 1000.

personally it seems 4000 IU is more the thing for daily maintenance. that's from all sources of course, sun food and supps. i haven't linked to the supporting research here, but it's all available somewhere in a past post or ten, here at TIMS!

at the end of the day it looks like if your kids are older than 12 months the recommendation is the same as for everyone else - up to age 50 at least.

Vitamin D
Unit μg/day IU/day
AI UL AI UL
Infants
0-6 mo 5* 25 200* 1000
7-12 mo 5* 25 200* 1000
Children
1-3 y 5* 50 200* 2000
4-8 y 5* 50 200* 2000
Males
9-13 y 5* 50 200* 2000
14-18 y 5* 50 200* 2000
19-30 y 5* 50 200* 2000
31-50 y 5* 50 200* 2000
51-70 y 10* 50 400* 2000
>70 y 15* 50 600* 2000
Females
9-13 y 5* 50 200* 2000
14-18 y 5* 50 200* 2000
19-30 y 5* 50 200* 2000
31-50 y 5* 50 200* 2000
51-70 y 10* 50 400* 2000
>70 y 15* 50 600* 2000
Pregnancy
< 18 y 5* 50 200* 2000
19-30 y 5* 50 200* 2000
31-50 y 5* 50 200* 2000
*in the absence of sufficient sunlight

sufficient sunlight is a judgement call, since it depends on where you are on the globe, atmospheric conditions, whether your skin is light or dark, covered or bare, sunscreen used or not, how long you're out, how old you are etc.

different people's bodies absorb supplements with varying efficiency/efficacy so it's hard to know what level will work for an individual.

blood work removes the guessing and tells you easily whether you are getting enough or too much from a given regimen.

HTH!
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 8944
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:28 pm

oh jeez .. formatting.. i am not about to go back and code through all that right now LOL hope you can figure out the columns okay!
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 8944
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Is hypovitaminosis D a MS environmental risk factor?

Postby MSUK » Mon Jul 12, 2010 6:00 am

Image

The role of hypovitaminosis D as a possible risk factor for multiple sclerosis is reviewed.

First, it is emphasized that hypovitaminosis D could be only one of the risk factors for multiple sclerosis and that numerous other environmental and genetic risk factors appear to interact and combine to trigger the disease.

Secondly, the classical physiological notions about vitamin D have recently been challenged and the main new findings are summarized....Read More - http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseact ... ageid/1334
MS-UK - http://www.ms-uk.org/
User avatar
MSUK
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2092
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2009 3:00 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Natural Approach

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users