all things magnesium

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Re: all things magnesium

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Oct 10, 2016 7:29 am

excerpt from an oldie but a goodie

Seelig, M. S. (1964). The requirement of magnesium by the normal adult Summary and analysis of published data. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 14(6), 342-390.
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/14/6/342.short

"The Occidental diet, however, provides an average of 250 to 300 mg. of magnesium daily, or less than 5 mg. per kg. per day for most adults. Because the Western diet is often also rich in protein, calcium and vitamin D, and alcohol ingestion is common, it is suggested that the optimal daily intake of magnesium should be 7 to 10 mg. per kg. per day.
The existence of subacute or chronic magnesium deficiency is difficult to diagnose. Because the tissues damaged by magnesium depletion are those of the cardiovascular, renal and the neuromuscular systems, early damage is not readily detectable. It is postulated that long-term suboptimal intakes of magnesium may participate in the pathogenesis of chronic diseases of these systems"
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
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PPI study (2016) Re: all things magnesium

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Nov 26, 2016 9:03 am

docs have you on PPIs? we've posted plenty about this here at TiMS but just to refresh here's a new study underscoring the need to monitor your mag status, esp while on meds which deplete nutrients that are particularly problematic for ms patients!

PTU-112 Proton Pump Inhibitors – A Risk for Micronutrient Deficiency. But Are We Looking Out for This? (2016)
http://gut.bmj.com/content/65/Suppl_1/A111.1.abstract
"Of 41 patients identified, 38 (92.7%) had not had serum magnesium checked in the last 12 months including 15 (36.59%) who had never had it checked. 32 (78.1%) had not had serum ferritin or B12 checked in the past 12 months. Including 9 (21.95%) whom had never had it checked. The median (!) magnesium level was low (0.77, range 0.76–0.89). The median ferritin was normal (106, range 13–196). There was one incidence of B12 deficiency (2.44% all patients, 31.3% of all those tested). Median serum B12 was normal (351, range 10.6–645)."
quite the b12 number, don't think i'd be blaming the ppis alone for that one. worst result i ever had as a long term vegan was essentially undetectable (assay was sensitive down to 75 and the lab results said verbatim 'less than 75').

<rant>serum magnesium should be part of regular bloodwork for everyone, not just ms patients. and since we can consistently identify statistically significant differences between control and patient means in the literature, that means serum mag is not a poor indicator of status. it means having a result inside the normal range does not mean no action is required. the 'normal' range itself is linguistically deceptive. patients and their health care professionals need to be very clear about the fact that normal includes sick AND optimal/healthy. it means that the max and min on the status quo 'normal' ranges used at labs and misinterpreted by docs if ordered at all are at best misleading and at worst irresponsible / negligent. for that matter, why would a doc bother ordering a test that ALWAYS comes back normal no matter how many magnesium deficiency symptoms their patient may have? it's nonsense. ranges need to be updated so that the problems which are common sense over in the public health arena, don't continue to slide under the radar in the clinical setting.</rant>
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9766
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Re: all things magnesium

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Dec 23, 2016 5:16 pm

does cover a lot of ground, but key findings more relevant to mg than any other specifically :)

Comparison of serum Concentration of Se, Pb, Mg, Cu, Zn, between MS patients and healthy controls
http://www.ephysician.ir/2016/2759.pdf
"Blood level of Mg was significantly lower in MS patients. But it should be noted that even with the low level of serum magnesium in MS
patients, this value is still in the normal range." yeah we know lol

arg i HATE when there's just p values in results but whatever :P
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9766
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Re: all things magnesium

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Jan 17, 2017 3:29 pm

think we have some sentence fragments muddying this abstract a bit, but for now, another piece of the puzzle at least:

The association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentration and risk of disease death in men: modification by magnesium intake
http://link.springer.com/article/10.100 ... 015-0006-9
Low vitamin D status increases the risk of death. Magnesium plays an essential role in vitamin D metabolism and low magnesium intake may predispose to vitamin D deficiency and potentiate the health problems. We investigated whether magnesium intake modifies the serum 25(OH)D3 concentration and its associations with mortality in middle-aged and older men.
We included 1892 men aged 42–60 years without cardiovascular disease or cancer at baseline in 1984–1989 from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.
Serum 25(OH)D3 was measured with the high-performance liquid chromatography using coulometric electrode array detection. Magnesium intake was assessed with 4-day food recording. Deaths were ascertained by a computer linkage to the national cause of death register. Deaths due accidents and suicides were excluded.
Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to analyze the associations. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for death in the lowest (<32.1 nmol/L) versus the highest (>49.4 nmol/L) serum 25(OH)D3 tertile was 1.31 (95 % CI 1.07–1.60, Ptrend = 0.01).
Stratified by the magnesium intake, the higher risk was observed only in the lower magnesium intake median (<414 mg/day); HR = 1.60 (95 % CI 1.19–2.13, Ptrend = 0.002) in the lowest versus the highest 25(OH)D3 tertile, whereas the corresponding HR = 1.07, 95 % CI 0.75–1.36, Ptrend = 0.63) in the higher magnesium intake median, P for interaction = 0.08.
In this cohort of middle-aged and older men low serum 25(OH)D3 concentration was associated with increased risk of death mainly in those with lower magnesium intake.
pretty sucky vit d3 averages in there. need a closer look at the magnesium groups. when i have time, will dig into the full text, if i can, to see if there's better clarity available.
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9766
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

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