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Magnesium As a Statin

Postby Shayk » Mon Mar 13, 2006 6:00 pm

Hi all

I accidentally happened upon this bit of info and thought it was interesting. It definitely suggests that magnesium operates like a statin.
Comparison of Mechanism and Functional Effects of Magnesium and Statin Pharmaceuticals
Mg has effects that parallel those of statins......

Mg at optimal cellular concentration is well accepted as a natural calcium channel blocker. More recent work shows that Mg also acts as a statin.

Magnesium was a recommended supplement for my high cortisol (stress hormone) levels. I take 400 mg. at night. Per what I've read, too much magnesium can cause diarrhea and GI distress, interfere with calcium absorption and bone metabolism. The good news, it's cheap :) $3.00 for 200 tablets (3 month supply).

Food sources are apparently artichokes, nuts, beans, whole grains, shellfish. (I haven't researched that, but I bet Melody or someone else will know :wink: .)

Sharon
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Postby Melody » Tue Mar 14, 2006 4:48 pm

Magnesium

Today: Wednesday, March 1, 2006


Click here for Ranked Table

This is one in a series of fact sheets containing information to help you select foods that provide adequate daily amounts of vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber as you follow the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The Guidelines are -
Eat a Variety of Foods
Maintain Desirable Weight
Avoid Too Much Fat, Saturated Fat, and Cholesterol
Eat Foods with Adequate Starch and Fiber
Avoid Too Much Sugar
Avoid Too Much Sodium
If You Drink Alcoholic Beverages, Do So in Moderation
[If you are taking cholesterol reducing drugs, Click here]
WHAT IS MEANT BY A GOOD FOOD SOURCE?

A good food source of magnesium contains a substantial amount of magnesium in relation to its calorie content and contributes at least 10 percent of the U.S. Recommended Dietary Allowance (U.S. RDA) for magnesium in a selected serving size. The U.S. RDA for magnesium is 400 milligrams per day. (The U.S. RDA given is for adults, except pregnant or lactating women, and children over 4 years of age.)

The U.S. RDA for magnesium is the amount of the mineral used as a standard in nutrition labeling of foods. This allowance is based on the 1968 Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for 24 sex-age categories set by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences. The 1989 RDA has been set at 280 milligrams per day for women 19 to 50 years of age and 350 milligrams for men 19 to 50 years of age.

As you can see, in 1985 and 1986, about 25 percent of the magnesium in diets of women was supplied by grain products and another 25 percent by fruits and vegetables. Meat, poultry, and fish provided about 18 percent of the magnesium. Fats, sweets, and beverages supply 14 percent of the magnesium; however, they are not considered in our list of "good sources" because they are high in calories compared to the amounts of vitamins and minerals they provide. Foods that contain small amounts of magnesium but are not considered good sources can contribute significant amounts of magnesium to an individual's diet if these foods are eaten often or in large amounts.

WHY DO WE NEED MAGNESIUM?
Magnesium, a mineral, is used in building bones, manufacturing proteins, releasing energy from muscle storage, and regulating body temperature.

DO WE GET ENOUGH MAGNESIUM?

According to recent USDA surveys, the average intake of magnesium by women 19 to 50 years of age was about 74 percent of the RDA. Men of the same age got about 94 percent of the recommended amount. About 50 percent of women had intakes below 70 percent of their RDA.

HOW CAN WE GET ENOUGH MAGNESIUM?

Eating a variety of foods that contain magnesium is the best way to get an adequate amount. Healthy individuals who eat a balanced diet rarely need supplements. Intakes of magnesium tend to be low in relation to recommendations, and there aren't that many foods that are really good sources; thus, it may take special care to ensure an adequate intake. The list of foods will help you select those that are good sources of magnesium as you follow the Dietary Guidelines. The list of good sources was derived from the same nutritive value of foods tables used to analyze information for recent food consumption surveys of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Human Nutrition Information Service.

HOW TO PREPARE FOODS TO RETAIN MAGNESIUM

Magnesium is lost in cooking some foods even under the best conditions. To retain magnesium: .Cook foods in a minimal amount of water. .Cook for the shortest possible time.

WHAT ABOUT WHOLE-GRAIN CEREALS?

Whole-grain ready-to-eat cereals usually contain 10 percent of the U.S. RDA for magnesium. Since cereals vary, check the label on the package for the percentage of the U.S. RDA for a specific cereal.

WHAT IS A SERVING?

The serving sizes used on the list of good sources are only estimates of the amounts of food you might eat. The amount of nutrient in a serving depends on the weight of the serving. For example, 1/2 cup of a cooked vegetable contains more magnesium than 1/2 cup of the same vegetable served raw, because a serving of the cooked vegetable weighs more. Therefore, the cooked vegetable may appear on the list while the raw form does not. The raw vegetable provides the nutrient - but just not enough in a 1/2-cup serving to be considered a good source.

WHAT ARE GOOD SOURCES OF MAGNESIUM?


FOOD SELECTED PERCENTAGE OF SERVING SIZE U.S. RDA (1)

BREADS, CEREALS, AND OTHER GRAIN PRODUCTS

Bread, whole-wheat 2 slices + English muffin, whole-wheat 1 + Muffin, bran 1 medium + Multigrain cereal, cooked 2/3 cup + Noodles, whole-wheat, cooked 1 cup + Pita bread, whole-wheat 1 small + Ready-to-eat cereals, whole-grain (2) 1 ounce + Rice, brown, cooked 2/3 cup + Spaghetti, high-protein, cooked 1 cup + Wheat germ, plain 2 tablespoons +

VEGETABLES

Artichoke, globe (french), cooked 1 medium + Beans, lima, cooked 1/2 cup + Broccoli, cooked 1/2 cup + Chard, cooked 1/2 cup + Okra, cooked 1/2 cup + Plantain, green or ripe, boiled 1 medium + Spinach, cooked 1/2 cup +

MEAT, POULTRY, FISH, AND ALTERNATES

Fish and Seafood Croaker; mackerel, or sea bass; baked or broiled 3 ounces + Oysters: Baked, broiled, or steamed 3 ounces + Canned, undrained 3 ounces + Scallops, baked, broiled, boiled, or steamed 3 ounces + Dry Beans, Peas, and Lentils Beans; black-eyed peas (cowpeas), chickpeas (garbanzo beans), soybeans, or white; cooked 1/2 cup + Soy milk (not baby formula) 1 cup + Tofu (bean curd) (3) 1/2 cup cubed +

Nuts and Seeds Almonds; roasted, dry-roasted, or unroasted 2 tablespoons + Brazil nuts, filberts (hazelnuts), or pine nuts (pignolias) 2 tablespoons + Cashews, roasted or dry-roasted 2 tablespoons + Mixed nuts, roasted 2 tablespoons + Peanut butter 2 tablespoons + Pumpkin or squash seeds, 2 tablespoons + hulled, unroasted Sesame seeds 2 tablespoons + Sunflower seeds, hulled, unroasted 2 tablespoons +

MILK, CHEESE, AND YOGURT

Milk, chocolate, made with skim milk 1 cup + Yogurt, plain, made with nonfat milk 8 ounces +

(1) A selected serving size contains -

+ 10-24 percent of the U.S. RDA for adults and children over 4 years of age

++ 25-39 percent of the U.S. RDA for adults and children over 4 years of age

+++ 40 percent or more of the U.S. RDA for adults and children over 4 years of age

(2) See section on whole-grain cereals.

(3) If made with magnesium chloride or nigari (a coagulant derived from seawater).
<shortened url>
John was diagnosed Jan 2005. On lipitor 20mg .On Copaxone since July 4,2005. Vitamin D3 2000iu-4000iu (depending on sunshine months)June 10 2005(RX::Dr. O'Connor) Omega 3 as well Turmeric since April 2005. Q10 60mg. 1500mg liquid Glucosamine Nov 2005.
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Postby Melody » Tue Mar 14, 2006 4:52 pm

Eating a wide variety of legumes, nuts, whole grains, and vegetables will help you meet your daily dietary need for magnesium. Selected food sources of magnesium are listed in Table 1.

Table 1: Selected food sources of magnesium [5]FOOD Milligrams (mg) %DV*
Halibut, cooked, 3 ounces 90 20
Almonds, dry roasted, 1 ounce 80 20
Cashews, dry roasted, 1 ounce 75 20
Soybeans, mature, cooked, ½ cup 75 20
Spinach, frozen, cooked, ½ cup 75 20
Nuts, mixed, dry roasted, 1 ounce 65 15
Cereal, shredded wheat, 2 rectangular biscuits 55 15
Oatmeal, instant, fortified, prepared w/ water, 1 cup 55 15
Potato, baked w/ skin, 1 medium 50 15
Peanuts, dry roasted, 1 ounce 50 15
Peanut butter, smooth, 2 Tablespoons 50 15
Wheat Bran, crude, 2 Tablespoons 45 10
Blackeyed Peas, cooked, ½ cup 45 10
Yogurt, plain, skim milk, 8 fluid ounces 45 10
Bran Flakes, ¾ cup 40 10
Vegetarian Baked Beans, ½ cup 40 10
Rice, brown, long-grained, cooked, ½ cup 40 10
Lentils, mature seeds, cooked, ½ cup 35 8
Avocado, California, ½ cup pureed 35 8
Kidney Beans, canned, ½ cup 35 8
Pinto Beans, cooked, ½ cup 35 8
Wheat Germ, crude, 2 Tablespoons 35 8
Chocolate milk, 1 cup 33 8
Banana, raw, 1 medium 30 8
Milk Chocolate candy bar, 1.5 ounce bar 28 8
Milk, reduced fat (2%) or fat free, 1 cup 27 8
Bread, whole wheat, commercially prepared, 1 slice 25 6
Raisins, seedless, ¼ cup packed 25 6
Whole Milk, 1 cup 24 6
Chocolate Pudding, 4 ounce ready-to-eat portion 24 6
<shortened url>
John was diagnosed Jan 2005. On lipitor 20mg .On Copaxone since July 4,2005. Vitamin D3 2000iu-4000iu (depending on sunshine months)June 10 2005(RX::Dr. O'Connor) Omega 3 as well Turmeric since April 2005. Q10 60mg. 1500mg liquid Glucosamine Nov 2005.
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Some interesting food facts here

Postby Melody » Tue Mar 14, 2006 4:57 pm

John was diagnosed Jan 2005. On lipitor 20mg .On Copaxone since July 4,2005. Vitamin D3 2000iu-4000iu (depending on sunshine months)June 10 2005(RX::Dr. O'Connor) Omega 3 as well Turmeric since April 2005. Q10 60mg. 1500mg liquid Glucosamine Nov 2005.
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Old magnesium study abstract

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Nov 27, 2006 11:48 pm

1: Acta Neurol Scand. 1990 Mar;81(3):197-200. Links
Magnesium concentration in brains from multiple sclerosis patients.Yasui M, Yase Y, Ando K, Adachi K, Mukoyama M, Ohsugi K.
Division of Neurological Diseases, Wakayama Medical College, Japan.

Magnesium (Mg) concentrations were studied in the brains of 4 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) and 5 controls. The magnesium contents were determined by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry in autopsy samples taken from 26 sites of central nervous system tissues, and visceral organs such as liver, spleen, kidney, heart and lung. The average Mg content in the CNS tissues, as well as visceral organs except for spleen, of MS patients showed a significantly lower value than that seen in control cases. The most marked reduction of Mg content was observed in CNS white matter including demyelinated plaques of MS samples. Whether or not these significantly lower Mg contents found in CNS and visceral organs of MS patients may play an essential role in the demyelinating process remain unclear, requiring further studies on MS pathogenesis from the point of metal metabolism.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2353567&dopt=Citation
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October 2003 review : magnesium and immune function

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Nov 28, 2006 4:13 pm

Possible roles of magnesium on the immune system

M Tam1, S Gómez2, M González-Gross2 and A Marcos2

1Departamento de Bioquímica y Fisiología, Instituto de Nutrición e Higiene de los Alimentos, Centro Habana, Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba

2Instituto de Nutrición y Bromatología, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, (CSIC), Madrid, Spain

Correspondence to: A Marcos, Instituto de Nutrición y Bromatología (CSIC), Edificio Instituto del Frío, Avenida Ramiro de Maetzu s/n, E-28040 Madrid, España. E-mail: amarcos@if.csis.es


Abstract

During the last few years, magnesium (Mg) has been subject of research due to its functionality in the organism. It is one of the most important micronutrients, and therefore its role in biological systems has been extensively investigated. Particularly, Mg has a strong relation with the immune system, in both nonspecific and specific immune response, also known as innate and acquired immune response. The aim of this paper is to review the state of the art about the interactions between Mg and the immune system. We discuss the link between dietary Mg and inflammation, apoptosis and alterations in number and function of innate immune cell populations, described in animal models. Furthermore, the immune system can be compromised in human populations under certain circumstances, including athletes and elderly people. The importance of a balanced Mg homeostasis and its interaction with the immune system in these groups has also been reviewed. Although emerging data support the relevant role of Mg in the immune response, further research is needed; and special efforts should be made to establish the most adequate dose in nutritional supplements to reach beneficial effects on health.

http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v57/n10/abs/1601689a.html
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1992 abstract

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Nov 28, 2006 4:16 pm

Magnes Res. 1992 Dec;5(4):281-93. Links
Magnesium and immune function: recent findings.McCoy H, Kenney MA.
Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.

Recent findings regarding roles for magnesium in immunocompetence confirm and extend previous knowledge of its participation in natural and adaptive immunity. The detrimental effects of severe magnesium deficiency have been confirmed. There is better comprehension of how magnesium relates to mechanisms that control cellular activities and regulate interactions among cells that affect immune functions. Insight has been gained into how magnesium status affects susceptibility to physiological disorders, such as cardiomyopathy and cancer, that are exacerbated by inflammation and by the chemical mediators of anaphylaxis. More information is needed about the impact of less severe magnesium deficiency and of supplemental magnesium on indicators of immune function. Future studies should explore interactive relationships between Mg and such nutrients as vitamin D to elucidate more completely the roles that Mg can play in optimizing immune function.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=1296765&dopt=Abstract
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1996 abstract - look, hormones!

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Nov 28, 2006 4:19 pm

Magnes Res. 1996 Oct;9(3):185-203. Links
Interactions between magnesium and vitamin D: possible implications in the immune system.McCoy H, Kenney MA.
Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, USA.

Evidence clearly shows that magnesium and vitamin D [1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3; 1,25(OH)2D3] independently affect numerous aspects of the immune system. Although no reports of interactive effects on components of immunity have been found, there is evidence that the two nutrients interact in other biosystems, sometimes involving calcium. Furthermore, this paper identifies numerous places in common where both magnesium and vitamin D reportedly affect immune function. Fundamental sites for possible interaction within the immune system include cell transformation, regulation of the cell cycle, stabilization of nuclear DNA/chromatin, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and effects on enzymatic and hormonal actions. The presence of different functional, chemical forms of both of the nutrients within biological systems, and the availability of synthetic drug relatives of both to introduce into such systems, complicate interactive studies because such differing forms may not necessarily interact similarly or interact at all within the immune system or elsewhere. Regardless, there are compelling reasons to believe that examining interactions between magnesium and vitamin D within the immune system could prove rewarding, especially since the physiological statuses of both nutrients in human populations are less than optimum. Such human populations include the elderly whose immune function may be compromised.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9140864&dopt=Abstract
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Magnesium and Vitamin D

Postby lyndacarol » Tue Nov 28, 2006 5:35 pm

But, Legs, I have taken a Magnesium supplement for YEARS and Vitamin D for 5 months! And NO changes I can attribute to them (except since starting D, my unprovoked bruising and fingernail ridges have gone away).
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mag lite

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Nov 28, 2006 6:13 pm

ya who knows, it's just interesting stuff. i always wonder if supplement amounts are sufficient since doing the D research. maybe it needs very specific other things present to be properly absorbed. i don't know yet, just starting into this branch of things
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Postby CureOrBust » Tue Nov 28, 2006 11:11 pm

or simply everyone is different. and what works for one does not work for others.
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too right

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Nov 29, 2006 5:09 pm

ya exactly. maybe the reason why ms manifests so differently in diff ppl is coz it has diff causes, and one person's symptoms could be from mg and another person's could be a whole other kettle of fish

hey cob i leave oz tomorrow, it's been a slice!
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Postby CureOrBust » Wed Nov 29, 2006 11:42 pm

amd not once did you take me out comming around a turn. Its amazing what a few thousand miles can do. It just wont be the same here (aus) without you.
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leaving aus

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Dec 01, 2006 10:50 pm

ha ha yes for one thing all the handsome eligible men will be migrating to canada im sure ;)
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interesting magnesium article

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Jun 26, 2007 1:59 pm

don't know if this one has made it on here previously but if so here it is again :)

http://www.naturaleater.com/science-art ... ciency.pdf

Med Hypotheses. 2001 Feb;56(2):163-70. Links
The multifaceted and widespread pathology of magnesium deficiency.Johnson S.
sjohnson@qwksilvr.com

Even though Mg is by far the least abundant serum electrolyte, it is extremely important for the metabolism of Ca, K, P, Zn, Cu, Fe, Na, Pb, Cd, HCl, acetylcholine, and nitric oxide (NO), for many enzymes, for the intracellular homeostasis and for activation of thiamine and therefore, for a very wide gamut of crucial body functions. Unfortunately, Mg absorption and elimination depend on a very large number of variables, at least one of which often goes awry, leading to a Mg deficiency that can present with many signs and symptoms. Mg absorption requires plenty of Mg in the diet, Se, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and vitamins B6 and D. Furthermore, it is hindered by excess fat. On the other hand, Mg levels are decreased by excess ethanol, salt, phosphoric acid (sodas) and coffee intake, by profuse sweating, by intense, prolonged stress, by excessive menstruation and vaginal flux, by diuretics and other drugs and by certain parasites (pinworms). The very small probability that all the variables affecting Mg levels will behave favorably, results in a high probability of a gradually intensifying Mg deficiency. It is highly regrettable that the deficiency of such an inexpensive, low-toxicity nutrient result in diseases that cause incalculable suffering and expense throughout the world. The range of pathologies associated with Mg deficiency is staggering: hypertension (cardiovascular disease, kidney and liver damage, etc.), peroxynitrite damage (migraine, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, etc.), recurrent bacterial infection due to low levels of nitric oxide in the cavities (sinuses, vagina, middle ear, lungs, throat, etc.), fungal infections due to a depressed immune system, thiamine deactivation (low gastric acid, behavioral disorders, etc.), premenstrual syndrome, Ca deficiency (osteoporosis, hypertension, mood swings, etc.), tooth cavities, hearing loss, diabetes type II, cramps, muscle weakness, impotence (lack of NO), aggression (lack of NO), fibromas, K deficiency (arrhythmia, hypertension, some forms of cancer), Fe accumulation, etc. Finally, because there are so many variables involved in the Mg metabolism, evaluating the effect of Mg in many diseases has frustrated many researchers who have simply tried supplementation with Mg, without undertaking the task of ensuring its absorption and preventing excessive elimination, rendering the study of Mg deficiency much more difficult than for most other nutrients.
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