a healthy gut

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Gut bacteria and inflammatory disease

Postby TwistedHelix » Thu May 29, 2008 8:05 am

Another article in favour of the hygiene hypothesis. It got me thinking that perhaps intestinal worms exert their beneficial effect by modifying the environment for gut bacteria. No evidence for this: just me wondering aloud.
I also liked the phrase, " inflammatory bowel disease – a constellation of diseases…", a good description of MS, perhaps?
Public release date: 28-May-2008
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Contact: Kathy Svitil
ksvitil@caltech.edu
626-395-8022
California Institute of Technology
Getting better with a little help from our 'micro' friends

PASADENA, Calif.-- A naturally occurring molecule made by symbiotic gut bacteria may offer a new type of treatment for inflammatory bowel disease, according to scientists at the California Institute of Technology.

"Most people tend to think of bacteria as insidious organisms that only make us sick," says Sarkis K. Mazmanian, an assistant professor of biology at Caltech, whose laboratory examines the symbiotic relationship between "good" bacteria and their mammalian hosts. Instead, he says, "bacteria can be beneficial and actively promote health."

For example, the 100 trillion bacteria occupying the human gut have evolved along with the human digestive and immune systems for millions of years. Some harmful microbes are responsible for infection and acute disease, while "other bacteria, the more intelligent ones, have taken the evolutionary route of shaping their environment by positively interacting with the host immune system to promote health, which gives them an improved place to live; it's like creating bacterial nirvana," says Mazmanian.

If bacteria are actively modifying the gut, their work would have to be mediated by molecules. In their recent work, Mazmanian and his colleagues have identified one such molecule, a sugar called polysaccharide A, or PSA, which is produced by the symbiotic gut bacterium Bacteroides fragilis. They have termed this molecule a "symbiosis factor," and predict that many other bacterial compounds with diverse beneficial activities await discovery.

To identify the molecule and its action, the scientists used experimental mice and induced changes to their intestinal bacteria by exposing them to a pathogenic bacterium called Helicobacter hepaticus. This microbe causes a disease in the mice that is similar to Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, when the animals were co-colonized with B. fragilis, they were protected from the disease--as were animals that were given oral doses of just the PSA molecule.

In particular, Mazmanian and his colleagues found that PSA induced particular immune-system cells called CD4+ T cells to produce interleukin-10 (IL-10), a molecule that has previously been shown to suppress inflammation--and offer protection from inflammatory bowel disease. "Thus, bacteria help reprogram our own immune system to promote health," he says.

"The most immediate and obvious implication is that PSA may potentially be developed as a natural therapeutic for inflammatory bowel disease," says Mazmanian.

Inflammatory bowel disease, a constellation of illnesses that cause inflammation in the intestines, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is estimated to affect one million Americans. The rates of inflammatory bowel diseases have skyrocketed in recent years; for example, the incidence of Crohn's disease, a condition that causes debilitating pain, diarrhea, and other gastrointestinal symptoms, has increased by 400 percent over the past 20 years.

The current research, along with other work by Mazmanian and June L. Round, a Caltech postdoctoral researcher, suggests that the interplay between various groups of bacteria living in the intestines has profound effects on human health.

This notion gels with the so-called "hygiene hypothesis." The hypothesis, first proposed two decades ago, links modern practices like sanitation, vaccination, a Western diet, and antibiotic use, which reduce bacterial infections, to the increased prevalence of a variety of illnesses in the developed world, including inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, multiple sclerosis, and Type 1 diabetes. However, it is now clear that increased living standards and antibacterial drugs affect not only infectious microbes, but all of the beneficial ones that we may depend on for our well-being.

"Through societal measures we have changed our association with the microbial world in a very short time span. We don't have the same contact with microbes as we have for millions of years--we just live too clean now," Mazmanian says. So while it is useful to eliminate disease-causing organisms, "perhaps disease results from the absence of beneficial bacteria and their good effects," he suggests. "This study is the first demonstration of that. What it hopefully will do is allow people to re-evaluate our opinions of bacteria. Not all are bad and some, maybe many, are beneficial."

###

The article, "A microbial symbiosis factor prevents intestinal inflammatory disease," will be featured on the cover of the May 29 issue of the journal Nature. Mazmanian's coauthors are June L. Round of Caltech and Dennis L. Kasper of Harvard Medical School.

Visit the Caltech Media Relations website at: http://pr.caltech.edu/media.
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Postby jimmylegs » Thu May 29, 2008 8:34 am

at the risk of repeating myself 8) the dawn of my antipathy to drugs was over-prescription of antibiotics... had to repopulate my good bacteria to put an end to my so-called "infections".

i too enjoy the constellation part :)
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intestinal flora may intensify MS study-antibiotics

Postby Selmahope » Thu Apr 29, 2010 2:16 pm

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Postby sams » Thu Apr 29, 2010 2:37 pm

interesting, the more research the better, thanks
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immune system in gut

Postby Selmahope » Thu Apr 29, 2010 3:29 pm

So much for the theory of building healthy flora in the gut as the key to immune health! So many conflicting theories.
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Postby Absentee » Thu Apr 29, 2010 5:22 pm

wasn't there another study recently though that showed a certain pro-biotic cocktail also helped those same mice?
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Postby tara97 » Fri Apr 30, 2010 12:15 am

hyeah especially H-pylori. in homeostasis these bacteria behave themselves just fine. I am starting to think that MS is a disease of the kidneys. kidney malfunction would certainly cause veinous insufficiency. it would also account for the difficulty nutralizing our acidic (protiens are acid) immune system with calcium brought up by D.
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Anyone have problem with yeast infection?

Postby MattB » Wed Jul 07, 2010 8:36 am

I'm 23 y/o male with MS. My prior girlfriend got a lot of yeast infections and my current girlfriend just got one and told me her gyno told her guys could spread it and told her about a test you can do to see if you have it. First thing when you wake up in the morning you spit into a glass of water and watch what it does. Normal spit will just hang out up top while the spit of a person with a broad yeast infection will sink to the bottom in stringy waves slowly. Sure enough mine formed some odd strings and sunk to the bottom slowly.

So I read about a general yeast infection and it says if you get it bad enough you can get a beer gut you just can't get rid of(I have that) that your head can be kind of foggy(I have that) and you can always be tired since the yeast consumes much of your sugars(I have that). So I'm guessing I have a really bad yeast infection. What should my next step be?
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Postby jimmylegs » Wed Jul 07, 2010 9:03 am

hiya :)

sorry to hear about your troubles, candida SUCKS. i did that test before and forgot all about it. i'm going to try it again if i remember in the morning :)

possible next steps for you:

-acidophilus (hi potency, per bottle instructions),
-selenium (200mcg/d x 1 week) (you can get this from 2-3 brazil nuts / d)
-zinc (25mg/d x 1 week)

acidophilus: you need to get your tummy ph down below 3, for starters. and boost the relative population of acidophilus vs candida in your GI microflora. do you currently take any acidophilus?

ref: <shortened url>

selenium can help you fight infections - selenium status even predicts survival for HIV patients.

selenium vs candida in mice:
http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/abstract/116/5/816
selenium vs HIV in humans:
http://journals.lww.com/jaids/Abstract/ ... ted.7.aspx

i had problems with candida infections (painful broken skin inflammation) when i was zinc deficient. no longer.

research findings are mixed but...

immune resistance to candida in zn-deficient animals:
http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/doi ... 190.002215

HTH!
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Postby Thomas » Wed Jul 07, 2010 12:08 pm

Hi Mattb. I had candida diagnosed by a naturopath a few weeks after I was diagnosed with MS. I went on a diet without sugar and without white flour and with lots of vegetables and no red meat, mostly fish. No beer. Mostly clean water.

Sounds extreme right? :) It is, but the positive effects it had on my health and wellbeing more than made up for it. Fatigue gone, feeling of being drunk all the time gone, energy returned. All within a few weeks. I'm still angry with my neurologist for not testing for candida and giving advice on diet.
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Postby MattB » Wed Jul 07, 2010 12:35 pm

So jimmylegs you think the spit test is the real deal?

Thomas, I'll have to look into that too as I've read sugar doesn't help.
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Postby jimmylegs » Wed Jul 07, 2010 5:47 pm

yea the diet plan is good too - supplement all you want but if you keep pouring in foods that feed the proliferation, what's the point!

i don't know about the spit test matt - i did a midday test and it sank. i have none of the symptoms that i used to have when i was really suffering.
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The Neuroscience of the Gut

Postby Algis » Wed Apr 20, 2011 10:53 pm

Strange but true: the brain is shaped by bacteria in the digestive tract...

http://www.scientificamerican.com/artic ... nce-of-gut
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Postby tara97 » Thu Apr 21, 2011 3:50 pm

good stuff!!!! I am gonna go take my probiotics 4 sure
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fecal transplants

Postby hwebb » Thu Apr 21, 2011 4:39 pm

Doesn't seem that strange to me that endothelial disruption int he gut could affect endothelia in the veins.

Anyway - there's a band of doctors worldwide treating neuro symptoms with fecal transplants:

http://healthmad.com/conditions-and-diseases/the-australians-offered-to-treat-parkinsons-transplant-stool/
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