zinc and MS

Discuss herbal therapies, vitamins and minerals, bee stings, etc. here

Postby jimmylegs » Thu May 05, 2011 3:17 pm

hey there, first find out what your serum zinc is and then we can worry about daily intakes and toxicity! yes just ask the GP for a test. i'd be interested to see where you're at given the daily supp at 18mg.

if they want you to provide justification for requesting the test i can fire you a link with abstracts, it's around here somewhere i posted it for mirry to take to her doc back in 2010. he was impressed!
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Postby HunnyBunny » Thu May 05, 2011 6:33 pm

Thanks so much, I have an appt already with my GP for Monday so I'll ask then to get it done. And once I have the results, I'll post and we can discuss!

Thx again, and as always, wishing you well!
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Re: zinc and MS

Postby jackD » Thu Mar 15, 2012 12:20 pm

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Re: zinc and MS

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:07 am

The effect of severe zinc deficiency on serum levels of albumin, transferrin, and prealbumin in man.
http://www.ajcn.org/content/34/9/1655.short
Abstract
Concentrations of three serum transport proteins, albumin, transferrin, and prealbumin, were determined in seven patients with severe zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency was manifested not only by depressed serum zinc concentrations, but also by skin lesions typical of zinc deficiency that corrected with zinc supplementation only. Concentrations of all three serum proteins were significantly depressed in zinc-deficient patients compared to healthy controls, and levels of all three proteins improved or corrected with a short period of zinc supplementation as the sole form of therapeutic intervention. Prealbumin levels dropped and corrected most rapidly, probably due in part to its short half-life of 2 days. This study demonstrates that zinc plays an important role in protein metabolism in man and is necessary for the maintenance of normal levels of certain transport proteins. These results support the possibility that zinc deficiency may alter tissue availability of other nutrients such as vitamin A or iron through its effect on transport proteins.
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Re: zinc and MS

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:08 am

Zinc or Copper Deficiency-Induced Impaired Inflammatory Response to Brain Trauma May Be Caused by the Concomitant Metallothionein Changes
http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10 ... LGO%2CJuan)
The role of zinc- and copper-deficient diets on the inflammatory response to traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been evaluated in adult rats. As expected, zinc deficiency decreased food intake and body weight gain, and the latter effect was higher than that observed in pair-fed rats. In noninjured brains, zinc deficiency only affected significantly lectin (increasing) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD) (decreasing) immunoreactivities (irs). In injured brains, a profound gliosis was observed in the area surrounding the lesion, along with severe damage to neurons as indicated by neuron specific enolase (NSE) ir, and the number of cells undergoing apoptosis (measured by TUNEL) was dramatically increased. Zinc deficiency significantly altered brain response to TBI, potentiating the microgliosis and reducing the astrogliosis, while increasing the number of apoptotic cells. Metallothioneins (MTs) are important zinc- and copper-binding proteins in the CNS, which could influence significantly the brain response to TBI because of their putative roles in metal homeostasis and antioxidant defenses. MT-I + II expression was dramatically increased by TBI, and this response was significantly blunted by zinc deficiency. The MT-III isoform was moderately increased by both TBI and zinc deficiency. TBI strongly increased oxidative stress levels, as demonstrated by malondialdehyde (MDA), protein tyrosine nitration (NITT), and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) levels irs, all of which were potentiated by zinc deficiency. Further analysis revealed unbalanced expression of prooxidant and antioxidant proteins besides MT, since the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and Cu,Zn-SOD were increased and decreased, respectively, by zinc deficiency. All these effects were attributable to zinc deficiency, since pair-fed rats did not differ from normally fed rats. In general, copper deficiency caused a similar pattern of responses, albeit more moderate. Results obtained in mice with a null mutation for the MT-I + II isoforms strongly suggest that most of the effects observed in the rat brain after zinc and copper deficiencies are attributable to the concomitant changes in the MT expression.
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Re: zinc and MS

Postby THX1138 » Mon Sep 08, 2014 6:11 pm

I am assuming that this thread is the equivalent of "All things Zinc".

Interaction among niacin, vitamin B6 and zinc in rats receiving ethanol. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3804611
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Re: zinc and MS

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Dec 27, 2014 11:33 am

i had posted this elsewhere on the forum earlier, but decided it deserved mention here as well:

Oral zinc aspartate treats experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
http://link.springer.com/article/10.100 ... 014-9786-8
"The essential trace element zinc plays a critical role in the regulation of immune homeostasis. Zinc deficiency or excess can cause severe impairment of the immune response, which points to the importance of the physiological and dietary control of zinc levels for a functioning immune system. We previously reported that injection of zinc aspartate suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS), as well as effector T cell functions in vitro. Among the preferred characteristics of novel therapeutics for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as MS are oral availability and a tolerable effective dose to minimize side effects. In this study, we investigated whether oral administration of zinc aspartate, an approved drug to treat zinc deficiency in humans, is effective in controlling EAE at clinically approved doses. We show that oral administration of 6 µg/day [0.3 mg/kg body weight (BW)] or 12 µg/day [0.6 mg/kg BW] of zinc aspartate reduces clinical and histopathological signs during the relapsing remitting phase of the disease in SJL mice. The clinical effect in mice was accompanied by suppression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF and IL-5 production in stimulated human T cells and mouse splenocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, a large array of proinflammatory cytokines was modulated by zinc aspartate exposure in vitro. These data suggest that administration of oral zinc aspartate may have beneficial effects on autoimmune diseases like MS."

so, if we take a closer look at that .6mg/kg dose, for a 180lb/80kg mouse ;) that would be about 50mg of zinc per day.
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Re: zinc and MS

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Dec 27, 2014 11:48 am

cross posted from 'of iron and ms':

i have posted this study around the site a few times over the past year and a bit, but thought this info (elevated iron with low zinc and copper in MS patients) deserved a spot here as well.

Serum level of iron, zinc and copper in patients with multiple sclerosis
http://jmj.jums.ac.ir/~jumsjmj/files/si ... 0187b3.pdf
"Introduction:
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common neurologic disorders. It appears that in addition to the common risk factors, there may be other factors, such as serum level of trace elements, which affect the development or course of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum levels of iron, zinc and copper in patients with MS and compare them with the control group.
Materials and Methods:
In this study, serum levels of iron, zinc and copper were determined in 25 patients with MS and compared with those of 25 healthy individuals matched with age and sex. Data were analyzed in SPSS, version17 using statistical descriptive methods (mean- percentage, SD) and t-test
Results:
In this study, there were 9 males in the case and control groups and the rest were female. The mean age of the patients was 28 ± 3.44 years for men and 24 ± 2.55 years for women. Mean serum iron levels were significantly elevated in MS patients (127.04 ± 34.67) compared to these levels in the control group (103.95 ± 33.81). Mean serum zinc levels were significantly decreased in MS patients (10.92 ± 2.114) as compared to these levels in the control group (14.05 ± 3.2). Also, mean serum copper levels were significantly decreased in MS patients (88.58 ± 19.56) compared to the levels in the control group (110.37 ± 37.1).
Conclusion:
The findings of this study show that serum levels of Iron, Zinc and Copper in patients with MS are different from those in normal population."

needs units for starters :) but still interesting.
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