zinc and MS

Discuss herbal therapies, vitamins and minerals, bee stings, etc. here

Re: zinc and MS

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Feb 11, 2017 6:20 pm

i just went over copper zinc ratios in an ms study. i was calculating zn:cu vs cu:zn as for that alzheimer's analysis above. thought i would flip the numbers here for the record
Ghazavi, A., Kianbakht, S., Ghasami, K., & Mosayebi, G. (2012). High copper and low zinc serum levels in Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis: a case control study. Clin Lab, 58(1-2), 161-164.
http://bit.ly/2lwAcyR

Table 1
..........................MS...:...................SPMS...:.................RRMS...:..............Controls
Zn level (µg/dL)...40.17 ±31.89a........23.12 ±10.59c.......42.06 ±32.94.......127.77 ±42.2
Cu level (µg/dL)..114.05 ±42b.........126.14 ±44.20.......111.22 ±39.45.........91.3 ±37
note the completely inverted copper zinc ratios, bad for RRMS and TERRIBLE for SPMS
cu:zn
Controls......91.3 / 127.8 = 0.71 (as you head for cu:zn of 1, you're getting close to danger zone; this is unusually good)
RRMS..........111.2 / 42.1 = 2.6 (awfully low, needs to be more like 1.1)
MS..............114.1 / 40.2 = 2.8 (splitting the difference between RRMS and SPMS)
SPMS..........126.1 / 23.1 = 5.5 (ouch! makes sense that this one is worst of all)

from other sources, optimal = 0.7-1.0

man. alzheimer's cu:zn ratios got NOTHIN on MS cu:zn ratios. we're a mess.
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 10777
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Advertisement

2017 review: Zinc in Infection and Inflammation

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Sep 20, 2017 7:10 am

Zinc in Infection and Inflammation (2017)
free full text: http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/9/6/624/htm

Abstract: Micronutrient homeostasis is a key factor in maintaining a healthy immune system. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is involved in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. The main cause of zinc deficiency is malnutrition. Zinc deficiency leads to cell-mediated immune dysfunctions among other manifestations. Consequently, such dysfunctions lead to a worse outcome in the response towards bacterial infection and sepsis. For instance, zinc is an essential component of the pathogen-eliminating signal transduction pathways leading to neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) formation, as well as inducing cell-mediated immunity over humoral immunity by regulating specific factors of differentiation. Additionally, zinc deficiency plays a role in inflammation, mainly elevating inflammatory response as well as damage to host tissue. Zinc is involved in the modulation of the proinflammatory response by targeting Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB), a transcription factor that is the master regulator of proinflammatory responses. It is also involved in controlling oxidative stress and regulating inflammatory cytokines. Zinc plays an intricate function during an immune response and its homeostasis is critical for sustaining proper immune function. This review will summarize the latest findings concerning the role of this micronutrient during the course of infections and inflammatory response and how the immune system modulates zinc depending on different stimuli.

related very interesting reference:

Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for zinc
EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA)
https://www.efsa.europa.eu/sites/defaul ... 14%2C0.pdf

in particular
Table 8: Average dietary zinc requirements depending on phytate intake and body weight

related tables of interest
Table 1: Criteria for categorising diets according to their potential absorption efficiency of zinc (adapted from WHO/FAO (2004))
Table 2: Overview of Dietary Reference Values for zinc for adults (especially the range of daily intake recommendations based on source bioavailability)

really great specifics on how best to manage zinc intakes in a variety of paleo, non paleo, omnivore and vegetarian/vegan settings.

this source gives the thumbs down to serum zinc as a useful indicator of zinc status. however, i've still seen enough studies in which healthy controls had high normal zinc, that it will take a bit more reading before i'm even potentially going to consider the low end of the serum zinc normal range as a desirable place to be. especially when getting serum zinc into the upper teens finally dislodged my serum uric acid level from its recalcitrant low normal level associated with ms (ie 194 in my case) and closer to levels enjoyed by healthy controls (278 in my case).
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 10777
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Re: zinc and MS

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Oct 27, 2017 12:58 pm

well this one certainly appears to go against the grain. possible connection to elevated copper zinc ratio? we've learned elsewhere that zinc deficit contributes to iron dysregulation/deposition. will bear looking into.

The Emerging Role of Zinc in the Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis
http://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/18/10/2070/htm
Abstract: Our lab has previously demonstrated that multiple sclerosis-induced spinal cord white matter damage and motor deficits are mediated by the pathological disruption of zinc homeostasis. Abnormal vesicular zinc release and intracellular zinc accumulation may mediate several steps in the pathophysiological processes of multiple sclerosis (MS), such as matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) activation, blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and subsequent immune cell infiltration from peripheral systems. Oral administration of a zinc chelator decreased BBB disruption, immune cell infiltration, and spinal white matter myelin destruction. Therefore, we hypothesized that zinc released into the extracellular space during MS progression is involved in destruction of the myelin sheath in spinal cord white mater and in generation of motor deficits. To confirm our previous study, we employed zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) knockout mice to test whether vesicular zinc depletion shows protective effects on multiple sclerosis-induced white matter damage and motor deficits. ZnT3 gene deletion profoundly reduced the daily clinical score of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) by suppression of inflammation and demyelination in the spinal cord. ZnT3 gene deletion also remarkably inhibited formation of multiple sclerosis-associated aberrant synaptic zinc patches, MMP-9 activation, and BBB disruption. These two studies strongly support our hypothesis that zinc release from presynaptic terminals may be involved in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis. Further studies will no doubt continue to add mechanistic detail to this process and with luck, clarify how these observations may lead to development of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 10777
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Re: zinc and MS

Postby NHE » Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:07 am

jimmylegs wrote:well this one certainly appears to go against the grain.


Well, after ~ 20 some days of taking 30 mg Zn/day my mobility is noticeably worse. It might be time to give it a break and see what happens.
User avatar
NHE
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 4559
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 3:00 pm

Re: zinc and MS

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Oct 28, 2017 10:43 am

sounds like no fun. how have your levels been? for serum zinc and copper, to start?
personally, after testing deficient, adding zinc only did me good. most noticeably in cognitive improvements. this is going back a number of years though. i still take zinc, but more sporadically than per doc's instructions when correcting deficiency.
also worth knowing serum ferritin, if one is planning to add zinc to the regimen.
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 10777
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Previous

Return to Natural Approach

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service