Curcumin & EGCG neuroprotection

Discuss herbal therapies, vitamins and minerals, bee stings, etc. here

Curcumin & EGCG neuroprotection

Postby NHE » Tue Feb 14, 2012 2:45 am

Curcumin, EGCG and other polyphenols have a neuroprotective effect through activation of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) via activating the Nrf2 transcription factor.


Modulation of Nrf2/ARE pathway by food polyphenols: a nutritional neuroprotective strategy for cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders.
Mol Neurobiol. 2011 Oct;44(2):192-201. Epub 2011 Apr 19.

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest, supported by a large number of experimental and epidemiological studies, for the beneficial effects of some phenolic substances, contained in commonly used spices and herbs, in preventing various age-related pathologic conditions, ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases. Although the exact mechanisms by which polyphenols promote these effects remain to be elucidated, several reports have shown their ability to stimulate a general xenobiotic response in the target cells, activating multiple defense genes. Data from our and other laboratories have previously demonstrated that curcumin, the yellow pigment of curry, strongly induces heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and activity in different brain cells via the activation of heterodimers of NF-E2-related factors 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant responsive element (ARE) pathway. Many studies clearly demonstrate that activation ofNrf2 target genes, and particularly HO-1, in astrocytes and neurons is strongly protective against inflammation, oxidative damage, and cell death. In the central nervous system, the HO system has been reported to be very active, and its modulation seems to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Recent and unpublished data from our group revealed that low concentrations of epigallocatechin-3-gallate, the major green tea catechin, induces HO-1 by ARE/Nrf2 pathway in hippocampal neurons, and by this induction, it is able to protect neurons against different models of oxidative damages. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that other phenolics, such as caffeic acid phenethyl ester and ethyl ferulate, are also able to protect neurons via HO-1 induction. These studies identify a novel class of compounds that could be used for therapeutic purposes as preventive agents against cognitive decline.


NHE
User avatar
NHE
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 3333
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 4:00 pm

Advertisement

Re: Curcumin neuroprotection

Postby NHE » Tue Feb 14, 2012 2:58 am

Curcumin protects astrocytes via Nrf2 activation.


Activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 cytoprotective signaling by curcumin protect primary spinal cord astrocytes against oxidative toxicity.
Biol Pharm Bull. 2011;34(8):1194-7

    Oxidative damage plays a critical role in many neurodegenerative diseases. Astrocytes are involved in supporting the survival and protection of neurons against oxidative damage. The dysfunction of antioxidant in astrocytes has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinalmuscularatrophy (SMA). The loss of motor neuron in spinal cord has been attributed to deterioration of astrocytes. The activation of antioxidantive function in astrocytes may serve as a therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master transcriptional regulator of phase II antioxidantive genes. We report herein that curcumin significantly activates Nrf2 target genes in primary spinal cord astrocytes, decreases the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and attenuates oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction.

The full paper is available for free.


NHE
User avatar
NHE
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 3333
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 4:00 pm

Re: Curcumin & EGCG neuroprotection

Postby jackD » Sun Feb 19, 2012 5:26 pm

Taking the EGCG with Curcumin with piperine seems like a real good idea.(see below abstract)

jackD

p.s I think that BCM-95 & Curcumin should also work well.

J Nutr. 2004 Aug;134(8):1948-52.

Piperine enhances the bioavailability of the tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate in mice.

Lambert JD, Hong J, Kim DH, Mishin VM, Yang CS.

SourceDepartment of Chemical Biology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA. joshua_lambert@hotmail.com

Abstract
(-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), from green tea (Camellia sinensis), has demonstrated chemopreventive activity in animal models of carcinogenesis. Previously, we reported the bioavailability of EGCG in rats (1.6%) and mice (26.5%).

Here, we report that cotreatment with a second dietary component, piperine (from black pepper), enhanced the bioavailability of EGCG in mice.

Intragastric coadministration of 163.8 micromol/kg EGCG and 70.2 micromol/kg piperine to male CF-1 mice increased the plasma C(max) and area under the curve (AUC) by 1.3-fold compared to mice treated with EGCG only.

Piperine appeared to increase EGCG bioavailability by inhibiting glucuronidation and gastrointestinal transit. Piperine (100 micromol/L) inhibited EGCG glucuronidation in mouse small intestine (by 40%) but not in hepatic microsomes. Piperine (20 micromol/L) also inhibited production of EGCG-3"-glucuronide in human HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Small intestinal EGCG levels in CF-1 mice following treatment with EGCG alone had a C(max) = 37.50 +/- 22.50 nmol/g at 60 min that then decreased to 5.14 +/- 1.65 nmol/g at 90 min; however, cotreatment with piperine resulted in a C(max) = 31.60 +/- 15.08 nmol/g at 90 min, and levels were maintained above 20 nmol/g until 180 min. This resulted in a significant increase in the small intestine EGCG AUC (4621.80 +/- 1958.72 vs. 1686.50 +/- 757.07 (nmol/g.min)). EGCG appearance in the colon and the feces of piperine-cotreated mice was slower than in mice treated with EGCG alone.

The present study demonstrates the modulation of the EGCG bioavailablity by a second dietary component and illustrates a mechanism for interactions between dietary chemicals.

PMID:15284381[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
User avatar
jackD
Family Elder
 
Posts: 319
Joined: Wed May 24, 2006 3:00 pm
Location: Near Wash DC

Re: Curcumin & EGCG neuroprotection, EGCG Bioavailability

Postby NHE » Sun Feb 19, 2012 11:47 pm

For EGCG bioavailability, a little lemon juice helps. Alternatively, ascorbic acid and sucrose also help. The combination increased the EGCG area under the curve concentrations by a factor of 3x in rats.

Common tea formulations modulate in vitro digestive recovery of green tea catechins.
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Sep;51(9):1152-62.

    Epidemiological evidence suggests a role for tea catechins in reduction of chronic disease risk. However, stability of catechins under digestive conditions is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to characterize the effect of common food additives on digestive recovery of tea catechins. Green tea water extracts were formulated in beverages providing 4.5, 18, 23, and 3.5 mg per 100 mL epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG), and epicatechin-gallate (ECG), respectively. Common commercial beverage additives; citric acid (CA), BHT, EDTA, ascorbic acid (AA), milk (bovine, soy, and rice), and citrus juice (orange, grapefruit, lemon, and lime) were formulated into finished tea beverages at incremental dosages. Samples were then subjected to in vitro digestion simulating gastric and small intestinal conditions with pre- and post-digestion catechin profiles assessed by HPLC. Catechin stability in green tea was poor with <20% total catechins remaining post-digestion. EGC and EGCG were most sensitive with less, not double equals 10% recovery. Teas formulated with 50% bovine, soy, and rice milk increased total catechin recovery significantly to 52, 55, and 69% respectively. Including 30 mg AA in 250 mL of tea beverage significantly (p<0.05) increased catechin recovery of EGC, EGCG, EC, and ECG to 74, 54, 82, and 45% respectively. Juice preparation resulted in the highest recovery of any formulation for EGC (81-98%), EGCG (56-76%), EC (86-95%), and ECG (30-55%). These data provide evidence that tea consumption practices and formulation factors likely impact catechin digestive recovery and may result in diverse physiological profiles.


Formulation with ascorbic acid and sucrose modulates catechin bioavailability from green tea.
Food Res Int. 2010 Jan 1;43(1):95-102.

    In order to investigate the impact of common food ingredients on catechin absorption, green tea (GT) extract (50 mg) was formulated plain, with sucrose (GT+S), with ascorbic acid (GT+AA) and with sucrose and ascorbic acid (GT+S+AA). Bioavailability and bioaccessibility were assessed in Sprague Dawley rats and an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model respectively. Absorption of epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) was significantly (P<0.05) enhanced in GT+S+AA formulations (AUC(0-6h)= 3237.0 and 181.8 pmol*h/L plasma respectively) relative to GT control (AUC(0-6h) = 1304.1 and 61.0 pmol*h/L plasma respectively). In vitro digestive recovery was higher for EGC and epicatechin (EC) (∼51-53%) relative to EGCG and epicatechin gallate (ECG) (< 20%) and was modestly enhanced in GT+S and GT+S+AA formulations. Accumulation of EGC, EGCG and ECG by Caco-2 cells was significantly (P<0.05) higher from GT+S+AA compared to other formulations while retention of catechins was enhanced in presence of ascorbic acid. These data suggest that formulation with sucrose and ascorbic acid may improve catechin bioavailability by enhancing bioaccessibility and intestinal uptake from tea. - The full paper is available.

Note: I don't really like the flavor of lemon with my green tea so I've been adding a little citric acid. I'm not sure how well that works. Perhaps I should switch over to ascorbic acid.

NHE
User avatar
NHE
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 3333
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 4:00 pm


Return to Natural Approach

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service