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Blog?

Postby NHE » Sat Sep 11, 2010 11:47 pm

Q: Is ThisIsMS a blog?

A: No. ThisIsMS is a discussion forum. Blogs are tools that facilitate one way communication. People share their knowledge or express their opinion which others can then read and post comments. In contrast, discussion forums such as ThisIsMS are more dynamic and facilitate two way communication allowing for online conversations.
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Broken URL, Part 2

Postby NHE » Wed Oct 20, 2010 8:56 pm

Q: Why doesn't the URL I put into my message work?

A: In a prior FAQ I discussed...
Note that sometimes a URL contains some peculiar characters, such as an exclamation point, parenthesis, or an apostrophe, which breaks the URL and causes the forum's software to truncate it rendering it inoperative. In this instance, embedding the URL with BBCode into the message text will not help but using the tinyurl or snipurl option usually will fix it.


There is an alternative to shortening the URL with tinyurl or snipurl. The url breaks at these characters because the character is being misinterpreted by the browser. The work-around is to encode the character using it's hexadecimal equivalent.

Consider the following url...

http://www.thisisms.com/this-is-a-(sample)-broken-url.html

The URL will break at the parentheses symbols. Replacing the parentheses symbols with their hex code from the table below will fix the URL and prevent it from breaking. In this case, %29 for ).

http://www.thisisms.com/this-is-a-(sample%29-broken-url.html

Notice now when you move your mouse cursor over the URL above that the correct URL with the parentheses symbols is displayed in your browser's status bar.

The URL can now be encoded using BBCode which is helpful for long URLs.

URL Character Code Table:

Image


Note: You may find that linking to an image does not work. It could be due to the presence of one of the special characters in the image's URL. Encoding the character should fix the broken image link.
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What is ThisIsMS?

Postby NHE » Wed Dec 15, 2010 5:09 am

Q: What is ThisIsMS?

A: ThisIsMS is a MS discussion forum with a worldwide audience. The purpose of ThisIsMS is to facilitate communication between MS patients, their caregivers and other individuals, such as doctors and researchers, with an interest in MS. The goal of ThisIsMS is to provide helpful information to those who need it so that by working together we can solve our common problems.

Q: What is not ThisIsMS?

A: ThisIsMS does not exist to be any particular individual's soapbox from which to conduct a battle. It is not a sporting arena. Flame wars and other antagonistic behavior will not be tolerated. There are other newsgroups and forums where such activity is acceptable. However, it will not be tolerated at ThisIsMS. Where appropriate, as deemed by the forum administrator and the forum moderators, a single warning will be issued and accounts will be closed without prior notice upon continuation of such activity.
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Linking to other articles

Postby NHE » Tue Apr 12, 2011 1:28 am

Q: I've noticed many articles either linked to or posted, either in part or in their entirety, to the forums. What is ThisIsMS's policy regarding this activity.

A: If you post a piece or quotation from another article to the forums, please provide a link to the original reference. In addition, the ThisIsMS policy states that...

All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owners. The comments are property of their posters, quoted articles are © referenced source, all the rest © 2002-2010 by thisisMS.com.



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Posting Pictures, Part 2

Postby NHE » Thu Apr 21, 2011 1:44 am

In another FAQ I discussed the basics of posting pictures to the forum. As a follow-up, here are a couple of links to review sites which discuss some of the image hosting sites that are available.


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Missing Post?

Postby NHE » Mon May 16, 2011 3:53 pm

Q: Why did my post disappear?

A: One possible reason is that the post may have been an inadvertent reply to a spam posting. Once the spam posting is removed, the reply may be so out of context that it loses meaning and will be removed along with the spam posting.
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Distorted Avatar Image

Postby NHE » Mon Sep 12, 2011 6:11 pm

Q: Why does my avatar image appear distorted?

A: In the Edit Avatar control panel, there is a new option to specify the dimensions of the avatar image in pixels. The default value for these fields is 125 pixels which is the maximum allowable size for the avatar image. However, if you are using a custom avatar and it differs in size from these values, then it will appear distorted as the avatar will likely be resized. There are two possible corrections for this problem. The first option is to set the value for these fields to the actual dimensions of your avatar image. The other option is to delete the values and leave the fields blank. The forum software will then attempt to determine the correct values on its own. If the image is larger than 125 pixels, then you will need to enter the correct numbers maintaining the proportions of the image so that 125 is the maximum dimension. Another option is to resize the image with image editing software and upload it to an image hosting site and then enter the image's URL into the avatar control panel.

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Automatically logged out

Postby NHE » Tue May 29, 2012 1:34 am

Q: Why do I keep getting logged out when using ThisIsMS?

A: The site may time out after a certain period of inactivity and automatically log you out of your current session. To prevent this from happening, select the check box for "Log me on automatically each visit" when you login. This will keep your session from timing out. If you don't actually wish to be logged in automatically from a particular computer, then you can delete the cookies from thisisms.com after you logout.

Important: If you use this option, then you should make certain that you logout of the site when you're done. Otherwise, anyone who restarts your browser may be logged in automatically. Note that in Mozilla Firefox you can set cookies to expire when the browser is closed and this should fix the automatically logged in problem. Internet Explorer, or other browsers, may have a similar option. For security, it's best to verify the behavior of your browser.
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Inappropriate Ads

Postby NHE » Wed Aug 15, 2012 8:36 pm

Q: I've been seeing some ads that are inappropriate for this site. Is there something that can be done about this?

A: Google serves ads based on each user's internet history that Google has assembled as well as the content of a particular web page. We do not have control over which specific ads are displayed. If you start seeing ads which you deem inappropriate, then you can delete your browser's cookies and reload the page. The objectionable ads should no longer be displayed. Note: deleting all cookies will require you to log back onto the site so do not do this if you're in the middle of composing a message without first saving it.
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Account Activation

Postby NHE » Mon Aug 27, 2012 2:00 am

Q: I tried to setup an account, but found that it had been deleted. Why did this happen?

A: Inactive accounts are removed after 15 days. To prevent your new account from being removed, be sure to activate it by clicking on the link in the account activation email you received.
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Broken URL, Part 3

Postby NHE » Wed Aug 29, 2012 2:56 am

Q: Why don't the URLs I copied from another post work?

A: Long URLs, i.e., longer than 55 characters, are automatically shortened by the forum software.

For example, this URL...

http://www.thisisms.com/this-is-a-long-url-that-has-been-shortened.htm

...will be changed to...

http://www.thisisms.com/this-is-a-long- ... rtened.htm

Note the ellipsis and the surrounding spaces that have been inserted into the URL.

Copying and pasting this shortened URL text into a new message will not work. They will show up in your new post as follows (note the cut-off portion of the link which is now inactive).

http://www.thisisms.com/this-is-a-long- ... rtened.htm

To solve this problem, right click on the URL you wish to copy and select "Copy Link Location" or whatever similar option your browser provides. The complete URL can now be pasted into your message.

Alternatively, if this is one of your own posts to the forum, then you can select "Edit" and then copy the URL from the editing screen and paste it into your new message.
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Formatting a post, part 2

Postby NHE » Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:11 am

Q: Are there special formatting options for posts?

A: Yes. Several new options have been recently added in addition to those already listed in the BBCode FAQ. These are discussed below.

Line Break
Code: Select all
[br][/br]

This inserts a line break. It's useful for when you want to bump the top line of a post down. Otherwise, initial line breaks, as well as spaces, are ignored by the forum software.

The line break is also useful for inserting breaks between items in a bulleted list. Without the line break tag, regular line breaks inserted with the enter key are ignored.

Align=
Code: Select all
[align=left/center/right/justify]text[/align]

This aligns text on a new line using one of the above four parameters, left, center, right and justify. Note, the [align=] BBCode tag can also be combined with other BBCode tags such as the [img] tag.

Example: Center aligned text. This is a line of centered text.

Example: A center aligned image with an embedded link.

Image

Left Align Image
Code: Select all
[imgl]http://image_url[/imgl]

Left aligns an image and wraps text around the image.

Example:

Ion channel isotypes, in general, allow for each isotype to have different functional properties that are appropriate to the function of its host cell. For example, isotypes may be differentially sensitive to intracellular modulators, i.e., signaling molecules, that allow cells to modify the properties of specific channels selectively in response to physiological effectors. However, some isotypes show no observable significant functional difference. The expression of the different isotypes can be developmentally regulated or in response to a physiological stimulus. This differential expression is controlled by DNA regulatory sequences which are typically upstream of the open reading frame coding for the channel. In addition, the sequences (peptide or nucleic acid) for different channel isotypes may encode information which can be used by the cell, e.g., the golgi and its related vesicular transport mechanisms, to target the channel protein to different discrete locations within the cell.

Right Align Image
Code: Select all
[imgr]http://image_url[/imgr]

Right aligns an image and wraps text around the image.

Example:

Ion channel isotypes, in general, allow for each isotype to have different functional properties that are appropriate to the function of its host cell. For example, isotypes may be differentially sensitive to intracellular modulators, i.e., signaling molecules, that allow cells to modify the properties of specific channels selectively in response to physiological effectors. However, some isotypes show no observable significant functional difference. The expression of the different isotypes can be developmentally regulated or in response to a physiological stimulus. This differential expression is controlled by DNA regulatory sequences which are typically upstream of the open reading frame coding for the channel. In addition, the sequences (peptide or nucleic acid) for different channel isotypes may encode information which can be used by the cell, e.g., the golgi and its related vesicular transport mechanisms, to target the channel protein to different discrete locations within the cell.

Note: This example also uses the [align=justify] BBCode.

Monospaced Font
Code: Select all
[mono]text[/mono]

Formats text with a monospaced font, such as Courier, which is useful for when you wish to line up columns of text as in a table. Note that it's helpful to preview your post before submitting it in order to be certain that the text lines up as you wish.

Example:

Zinc ··········· 18.2 µmol/L
Magnesium ······ 0.95 mmol/L
Vitamin D3 ····· 150 nmol/L


Subscript Text
Code: Select all
[sub]text[/sub]

Formats text as subscript.

Example: Citric acid is H3C6H5O7 while magnesium citrate is Mg3(C6H5O7)2.

Note that subscript text can also be useful for adding footnotes 1 to your post.

1. Footnotes provide extra information. :)

Superscript Text
Code: Select all
[sup]text[/sup]

Formats text as superscript.

Example: Vitamin E has three chiral centers each of which can exist in one of two possible configurations. Therefore, synthetic vitamin E will have eight, 23=8, isomers, also known as enantiomers, which will be present in equal concentrations. Natural vitamin E (RRR-alphatocopherol) will only exist as 1/8, or 12.5%, of the total vitamin E in synthetic vitamin E 2.

2. Note that the one eighth fraction in the above example uses a combination of superscript and subscript.
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Frequently used abbreviations

Postby NHE » Wed Jun 12, 2013 6:27 pm

Q: I've noticed that many abbreviations are frequently used in the forums. Is there someplace I can look them up?

A: Yes. Here's a list of commonly used abbreviations at ThisIsMS. Note: If there's something I've missed, send me a PM and let me know and I'll add it.



·A·

ABC's: Avonex, Betaseron & Copaxone
ABX: antibiotics
ACTRIMS: Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis
AD: Alzheimer's Disease
ADEM: acute disseminated encephalomyelitis
ALS: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
AO: atlas orthogonal
APC: antigen presenting cell
ARR: annual relapse rate
AZV: azygos vein

·B·

BBB: blood brain barrier
BMA: bone marrow aspiration
BMT: bone marrow transplant
BNAC: Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center
BP: blood pressure

·C·

CAT: computer assisted tomography, CAT scan
CBC: Complete Blood Count
CBF: cerebral blood flow
CBFV: cerebral blood flow velocity
CCSVI: Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency
CCVBP: chronic craniocervical venous back pressure
CD: coeliac disease
CDMS: clinically definite multiple sclerosis
CDS: color Doppler sonography
CF: Cognitive Fatigue
CFS: chronic fatigue syndrome
CIDP: Chronic Inflamatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy
CIS: clinically isolated syndrome
CMSC: Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers
CMT: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disorder
CNS: central nervous system
COP1: copolymer-1, Copaxone
CPN: Chlamydia pneumoniae
CRABs: Copaxone, Rebif, Avonex & Betaseron
CREAE: Chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis
CSF: cerebrospinal fluid
CST: cranial sacral therapy
CT: computed tomography
CTEVD: combined transcranial and extracranial venous doppler
CTS: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

·D·

DDX: differential diagnosis
DMD: disease modifying drug
DVT: deep vein thrombosis
DX: diagnosed or diagnosis

·E·

EAE: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
EBV: Epstein-Barr virus
ECD: Echo Color Doppler
ECDU: extracranial duplex ultrasound
ECTRIMS: European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis
EDS: Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome
EDSS: expanded disability status scale
EMG: Electromyography

·F·

FMT: Fecal Microbiota Transplantation
FSS: fatigue severity scale

·G·

GA: glatiramer acetate, Copaxone
GAD: gadolinium, an MRI contrast agent
GM: gray matter
GNDS: Guy's neurological disability scale
GP: general practitioner

·H·

HBOT: hyperbaric oxygen therapy
HC: healthy controls
HERV: human endogenous retrovirus
HLA: human leukocyte antigen
HNPP: Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies
HSCT: hematopoietic stem cell therapy

·I·

IBT: inclined bed therapy
ICP: intracranial pressure
IfnB: interferon beta
IfnB1a: interferon beta-1a, Avonex or Rebif
IfnB1b: interferon beta-1b, Betaseron
IHH: idiopathic intracranial hypertension
IJV: internal jugular vein
IL-#: interleukin, e.g., IL-2 & IL-10
IM: intramuscular
INVD: Institute for Neurovascular Diseases
IPIR: immediate post injection reaction
IR: interventional radiologist
IRIS: immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome
IV: Intravenous
IVUS: intravascular ultrasound

·J·

JCV: John Cunningham virus, associated with PML

·K·

KPS: Karnofsky Performance Scale

·L·

LDN: Low Dose Naltrexone
LIJV: left internal jugular vein
LLMD: lyme literate medical doctor

·M·

MBP: myelin basic protein
MFI: Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory
MFIS: modified fatigue impact scale
mfVEP: multifocal visual evoked potentials
MHC: major histocompatibility complex
MMP: matrix metalloproteinases
MOG: myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein
MRA: magnetic resonance angiography
MRF: Myelin Repair Foundation
MRI: magnetic resonance imaging
MRV: magnetic resonance venography
MSAA: Multiple Sclerosis Association Of America
MSC: mesenchymal stem cells
MSFC: Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite
MSQLI: Multiple Sclerosis Quality-of-Life Inventory
MSRV: multiple sclerosis associated retrovirus
MSSS: Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score
MTHFR: methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase
MTS: May-Thurner Syndrome

·N·

NAWM: normal appearing white matter
NCS: National CCSVI Socitey
NCS: Nutcracker Syndrome, aka, Renal Vein Compression
NINDS: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
NKC: natural killer cell
NMO: neuromyelitis optica, Devic's Disease
NMR: nuclear magnetic resonance
NMSS: National Multiple Sclerosis Society
NPH: normal pressure hydrocephalus
NUCCA: National Upper Cervical Chiropractic Association

·O·

OCT: optical coherence tomography
ON: optic neuritis
OPC: Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells
OT: occupational therapy

·P·

PASAT: Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test
PBMC: Peripheral blood mononuclear cell
PBX: probiotics
PCNSL: Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma
PCP: primary care physician
PCS: Pelvic Congestion Syndrome
PD: Parkinson's Disease
PLP: proteolipid protein
PLS: primary lateral sclerosis
PML: progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy
PNS: peripheral nervous system
POMS: pediatric onset multiple sclerosis
POTS: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome
PPMS: primary progressive MS
PRMS: progressive relapsing MS
PT: physical therapist or physical therapy
PTA: percutaneous transluminal angioplasty
PUFA: polyunsaturated fatty acid
PwMS: people with MS

·R·

RBC: red blood cell
RCT: randomized controlled trial
RIJV: right internal jugular vein
RIS: radiologically isolated syndrome
RRMS: relapse remitting MS

·S·

SC: subcutaneous
SDGM: Subcortical Deep Gray Matter
SFB: segmented filamentous bacteria
SIR: Society of Interventional Radiology
SNPs: single-nucleotide polymorphisms
SNS: somatic nervous system
SOT: Sacro-Occipital Technique
SPECT: single photon emission computed tomography
SPMS: secondary progressive MS
SPS: Stiff Person Syndrome
SS: Sjögren's Syndrome
SSVP: superior sagittal sinus venous pressure
SWI: Susceptibility weighted imaging
SX: symptoms or side effects

·T·

TCM: traditional Chinese medicine
TCR: T-cell receptor
TENS: Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulator
TM: transverse myelitis or transverse myelopathy
TN: trigeminal neuralgia
TNF: tumor necrosis factor
TOS: thoracic outlet syndrome

·U·

UC: upper cervical
UCC: upper cervical chiropractic
US: ultrasound

·V·

VCE: video capsule endoscopy
VEP: visual evoked potentials
VHISS: venous hemodynamic insufficiency severity score
VV: vertebral veins

·W·

WBC: white blood cell
WM: white matter

·Y·

YOPD:Young Onset Parkinson's Disease
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Forum and topic icons

Postby NHE » Wed Oct 09, 2013 5:15 am

Q: What do all of those different icons next to forums and topics mean?

A: The forum software uses various icons to indicate the status of the different forums and topics. The Subsilver2 style has keys that display what these different icons mean.

Note: To change the board style: User Control Panel > Board preferences > Edit global settings > My board style

Subsilver2 Forum Icons:
Image

Subsilver2 Topic Icons:
Note: Topic icons with a black dot indicate topics which contain at least one of your posts
Image

However, the Prosilver style does not make these keys available. Here is a brief listing of the various icons in Prosilver.

Prosilver Forum Icons:

Unread Posts No Unread Posts Forum Locked


Prosilver Topic Icons:
Note: Topic icons with a red star indicate topics which contain at least one of your posts.




Unread Posts


Unread Posts Popular


Unread Posts Locked
No Unread Posts


No Unread Posts Popular


No Unread Posts Locked
Announcement


Sticky Topic


Moved Topic
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ThisIsMS Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

Postby NHE » Wed Oct 23, 2013 1:59 am

Q: What are this site's Terms of Use and Privacy Policies? I don't see them linked to anywhere before I register.

A: The registration page was recently modified. Hopefully, these links will get put back on that page.

Terms of Use: ucp.php?mode=terms

Privacy Policy: ucp.php?mode=privacy

Updated Terms of Use as of April 15, 2014: terms.html
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