Amitriptyline for spasticity?

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Txaamsm32
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Amitriptyline for spasticity?

Post by Txaamsm32 » Fri Dec 16, 2016 5:01 am

was prescribed this stuff and just read up on it in google an its a antidepressant....i've always been wary of this kind of thing, the side effect of wanting to kill yourself was always a red flag for me.
has anyone taken this for pain an such. does it help an is it worth it?

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hargarah
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Re: Amitriptyline for spasticity?

Post by hargarah » Fri Dec 16, 2016 11:33 am

It is a "Cheap Man's Drug", because it has been around for decades, But it is the BEST for pain! Viagra is meant for the Heart, but they found it has Other Uses!

Take it at a low dose and it is amazing for pain. Max of 125mg per day. Neurological pain is the hardest to treat. Even Opiods are often ineffective. The best for Neuro pain is anti-spaspatic or epilepsy drugs. Take Clonzapam for spasticity or baclofen or zanaflex, NOT amitriptalene

Hope this helps!

ElliotB
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Re: Amitriptyline for spasticity?

Post by ElliotB » Fri Dec 16, 2016 12:27 pm

Have you explored the old fashioned non-pill option of 'exercise' (lots of it)'? It works for me. Exercise is good for us both physically and mentally!

While on the topic of Viagra, my doctor prescribed Cialis for my nerve pain and having to 'go' often (about once an hour). It works for me! My nerve pain while not totally gone is very much improved and while taking Cialis, I can last 3-4 hours between bathroom breaks.

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Scott1
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Re: Amitriptyline for spasticity?

Post by Scott1 » Fri Dec 16, 2016 1:57 pm

Hi,

Your question was about using this for spasticity. The short answer is it will do nothing for that.

It is a tricyclic antidepressant. It works on the brain as an inhibitor of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake. Those neurotransmitters influence mood.

The neurotransmitter that relates to muscle activation is acetylcholine. Simply, it is the chemical that the motor neurons of the nervous system release in order to activate muscles. The neurotransmitter signal passes to the cell where in a quick multistep process it causes sodium to flood into the cell, potassium is pushed out and calcium leaves a part of the cell through ion channels to trigger strands of muscle proteins to bind to each other. The bonds that are formed are called rigor bonds and they are incredibly strong. Another molecule called ATP is used to break those bonds so the muscle releases. It has absolutely nothing to do with serotonin or norepinephrine.

The Amitriptyline may make you feel better about spasticity but it won't change the underlying reason your muscles are tight.

To influence tightness at the cellular level, Baclofen is often tried because it is a potassium channel blocker. By slowing how fast potassium can flow out of the cell it regulates how fast sodium can flow in and maybe the process can become more normal. Baclofen can also influence mood as it binds also to the GABA receptor. I found the doses required are not as high as they prescribe and there is a tendency to use a sledgehammer to crack an egg with consequences for your stomach and wakefulness.

A better way is to leave the calcium unable to reach the muscle strands by blocking the ion channels it flows through. Those channels are called ryanodine receptors. 2x 25 mg daily of Dantrium is very effective so you need to have a real problem with spasticity first otherwise Baclofen might be more appropriate. I use Dantrium and love it. There is no impact on mood at all. It is very specific. However, if you are not prepared to exercise your muscles eccentrically (pilates or Yoga) then don't take it as you will not manage the sudden release of muscle tightness and just feel weak.

Another alternative is magnesium as it also binds to the ryanodine receptor. I also take some of that so I can keep my Dantrium to a low dose.

So what you need to consider is whether you are depressed and need something for that or whether your real concern is muscle tightness.

Regards,
Last edited by Scott1 on Sun Dec 18, 2016 4:19 am, edited 4 times in total.

Txaamsm32
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Re: Amitriptyline for spasticity?

Post by Txaamsm32 » Fri Dec 16, 2016 3:10 pm

found it pretty useless for the spasms an cramps. most it did was put me to sleep. my magnesium just got in as well hopefully that helps out. and i work out here an there...the fatigue is hard to get through though. its weird when i used to be able to workout six days a week for basketball easy. now after a few sets i feel like i've been through the wringer. but im trying :)
the nurse said it was just a trial run an we'll find something that helps an thank you for the heads up on other drugs to try i'll write them down and bring them with me my next appointment.

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Scott1
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Re: Amitriptyline for spasticity?

Post by Scott1 » Fri Dec 16, 2016 5:32 pm

Hi,

Fatigue is different from spasticity. In that case you are looking at oxidative stress and energy pools formed in the mitochondria. MitoQ have an interesting product that mops up free radicals and provides some fatigue relief. It is a cousin of CoQ10 which would perform that role and also improve the electron transport chain to help you make energy.
These articles and videos may help on MitoQ (from MStranslate)-

http://www.mstranslate.com.au/mitoq-mit ... nction-ms/




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jimmylegs
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Re: Amitriptyline for spasticity?

Post by jimmylegs » Sat Dec 17, 2016 5:35 pm

@Txaamsm32 what kind of mag, iima?
https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses

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pursue optimal self care, with or without a diagnosis.

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