Coagulation Dysfunction

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Petr75
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Coagulation Dysfunction

Post by Petr75 » Tue Feb 19, 2019 10:52 am

2019 Jan 14
S.O.C. Neurologia, Ospedale San Biagio, Domodossola, Italy
A Perspective of Coagulation Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis and in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis.
PMC https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6340371/

Abstract
A key role of both coagulation and vascular thrombosis has been reported since the first descriptions of multiple sclerosis (MS). Subsequently, the observation of a close concordance between perivascular fibrin(ogen) deposition and the occurrence of clinical signs in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, led to numerous investigations focused on the role of thrombin and fibrin(ogen). Indeed, the activation of microglia, resident innate immune cells, occurs early after fibrinogen leakage in the pre-demyelinating lesion stage of EAE and MS. Thrombin has both neuroprotective and pro-apoptotic effects according to its concentration. After exposure to high concentrations of thrombin, astrocytes become reactive and lose their neuroprotective and supportive functions, microglia proliferate, and produce reactive oxygen species, IL-1β, and TNFα. Heparin inhibits the thrombin generation and suppresses EAE. Platelets play an important role too. Indeed, in the acute phase of the disease, they begin the inflammatory response in the central nervous system by producing of IL-1alpha and triggering and amplifying the immune response. Their depletion, on the contrary, ameliorates the course of EAE. Finally, it has been proven that the use of several anticoagulant agents can successfully improve EAE. Altogether, these studies highlight the role of the coagulation pathway in the pathophysiology of MS and suggest possible therapeutic targets that may complement existing treatments.

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Re: Coagulation Dysfunction

Post by Petr75 » Wed Apr 10, 2019 6:01 am

2019 Mar 5
Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, Department of General Biochemistry, University of Lodz, Poland
Increased level of fibrinogen chains in the proteome of blood platelets in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30838756

Abstract
Epidemiological studies indicate a high risk of stroke, heart failure and myocardial infarction in patients with multiple sclerosis, especially in its secondary progressive (SPMS) phase. Some ischaemic events are directly associated with abnormal platelet functions and their prothrombotic activity. Recent reports, including this study, confirm the increased activation of circulating platelets in SPMS, and also show increased platelet reactivity, among other responses, as well as strong aggregation. In this current study, we conducted a comparative analysis of the platelet proteome in SPMS patients and in healthy controls, to demonstrate the quantitative and qualitative differences likely to affect functional changes observed in SPMS. During densitometry evaluation of 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis, we observed differences between the electrophoretic patterns of SPMS platelets and the control samples. To determine a detailed characterisation of the proteome changes in the SPMS patients' blood platelets, in the next stage, we performed mass spectrometry of selected spots and indicated the increased presence of four proteins (fibrinogen, α-2 macroglobulin, septin-14 and tubulin β-1 chain). The most important of these is the increased amount of prothrombotic protein, fibrinogen, which seems to confirm the accuracy of the imaging and potentially explains the increased risk of platelet-origin thrombotic events. This study provides new knowledge of the potential existence of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the acceleration of the platelet pro-coagulant function in SPMS. This can help to identify new targets for therapy, which can then be used not only in the second stage of the disease.

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Re: Coagulation Dysfunction

Post by Petr75 » Wed Apr 10, 2019 6:11 am

2019 Feb 14
Geriatrics, Neuroscience, Orthopaedics, Head and Neck Department, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario, Rome, Italy
Genome-Wide Multiple Sclerosis Association Data and Coagulation
PMC https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6383413/

Abstract
The emerging concept of a crosstalk between hemostasis, inflammation, and immune system prompt recent works on coagulation cascade in multiple sclerosis (MS). Studies on MS pathology identified several coagulation factors since the beginning of the disease pathophysiology: fibrin deposition with breakdown of blood brain barrier, and coagulation factors within active plaques may exert pathogenic role, especially through the innate immune system. Studies on circulating coagulation factors showed complex imbalance involving several components of hemostasis cascade (thrombin, factor X, factor XII). To analyze the role of the coagulation process in connection with other pathogenic pathways, we implemented a systematic matching of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) data with an informative and unbiased network of coagulation pathways. Using MetaCore (version 6.35 build 69300, 2018) we analyzed the connectivity (i.e., direct and indirect interactions among two networks) between the network of the coagulation process and the network resulting from feeding into MetaCore the MS GWAS data. The two networks presented a remarkable over-connectivity: 958 connections vs. 561 expected by chance; z-score = 17.39; p-value < 0.00001. Moreover, genes coding for cluster of differentiation 40 (CD40) and plasminogen activator, urokinase (PLAU) shared both networks, pointed to an integral interplay between coagulation cascade and main pathogenic immune effectors. In fact, CD40 pathways is especially operative in B cells, that are currently a major therapeutic target in MS field. The potential interaction of PLAU with a signal of paramount importance for B cell pathogenicity, such as CD40, suggest new lines of research and pave the way to implement new therapeutic targets.

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