Triggers

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robbie
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Triggers

Post by robbie » Fri Aug 30, 2019 10:53 am

What would be the triggers for these people?

SPMS occurs in people who initially had a relapsing-remitting disease course. In other words, SPMS occurs as a second phase of the disease for many individuals. PPMS is the first — and only — phase of the illness for approximately 10% of people with MS. ... People with PPMS never experience any relapses.
Had ms for 27 yrs, taken a different approach to treatment I call it the FUMS treatment
DISCLAIMER anything posted by me is purely made from anger and disdain for ms,
Regime
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robbie
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Location: Northern Ontario, Canada

Re: Triggers

Post by robbie » Mon Sep 02, 2019 2:36 pm

How does a kid or teenager that hasn't had the time to indulge in the "triggers" get the same ms?
Had ms for 27 yrs, taken a different approach to treatment I call it the FUMS treatment
DISCLAIMER anything posted by me is purely made from anger and disdain for ms,
Regime
2 cigars a day
4 beers
6 or more codein
2 valium
Pot as needed

robbie
Family Elder
Posts: 1285
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 3:00 pm
Location: Northern Ontario, Canada

Re: Triggers

Post by robbie » Mon Sep 09, 2019 3:14 pm

Predicting the Course of Mild MS

But what does this mean for people with mild MS symptoms? Some good news and some bad news. You’re probably wondering if your condition is likely to get any worse. This is the million-dollar question for anyone with MS, and, of course, the answer is… *drum roll*

No one yet knows. Yes, it would be nice if doctors carried crystal balls alongside their stethoscopes but, sadly, medical degrees don’t make them fortune-tellers.

That said, there are a few indicators which may be helpful when it comes to assessing your disease status. In the study above, for example, the researchers found that those with more brain lesions detected on scans were also more likely to develop signs of the disease .

Of course, everybody is different, which is why it’s vital to have regular check-ups with your neurologist regardless of your symptoms. This really is the only way to assess the activity of the disease and establish the most effective treatment plan for you.

No matter how mild your MS symptoms, looking after your health is something that should never be taken mildly.
Had ms for 27 yrs, taken a different approach to treatment I call it the FUMS treatment
DISCLAIMER anything posted by me is purely made from anger and disdain for ms,
Regime
2 cigars a day
4 beers
6 or more codein
2 valium
Pot as needed

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NHE
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Re: Triggers

Post by NHE » Mon Sep 09, 2019 10:37 pm

robbie wrote:
Mon Sep 09, 2019 3:14 pm
No one yet knows. Yes, it would be nice if doctors carried crystal balls alongside their stethoscopes but, sadly, medical degrees don’t make them fortune-tellers.
...and they aren't God's either. They don't know everything. They simply don't have the hours available to spend searching through articles on PubMed. If something isn't published in JAMA or the New England Journal of Medicine (or whatever journal is considered mainstream for their field), then the research often-times doesn't even exist to them.

Case in point, when I was dx in 1999 my neurologist gave me glossy pamphlets for the 3 ABC drugs. I discovered that the pamphlets all had an almost hidden pocket with the prescribing information tucked into them. I studied each of the 3 prescribing information pamphlets with a medical dictionary and the proverbial fine toothed comb.

At a subsequent appointment with my neurologist where we were discussing the treatment options, he asked me what I thought about Copaxone. I told him that I was concerned that it was found to be clastogenic (causes breaks in DNA). He seemed surprised and asked me with a tone of disbelief where I had read that Copaxone was clastogenic. I told him that it was in the prescribing information pamphlets he had given me. That was the end of that discussion. In essence, by studying the available literature, I had wound up knowing more about the ABC drugs than he did.

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