drugs to improve nutrient status (because that makes sense)

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jimmylegs
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drugs to improve nutrient status (because that makes sense)

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Mar 13, 2017 8:46 am

Effects of Canagliflozin on Serum Magnesium in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Post Hoc Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials (2017)
https://link.springer.com/article/10.10 ... 017-0232-0

Abstract
Introduction
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, on serum magnesium in hypomagnesemic patients with type 2 diabetes.

Methods
This post hoc analysis was based on pooled data from four placebo-controlled studies of canagliflozin (N = 2313). The proportion of patients with baseline serum magnesium <0.74 mmol/L who achieved serum magnesium ≥0.74 mmol/L at week 26 was evaluated.

Results
At week 26, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg increased serum magnesium versus placebo in patients with baseline serum magnesium <0.74 mmol/L (17.0% and 19.0% vs 3.9%) and ≥0.74 mmol/L (4.9% and 7.0% vs −1.4%). More patients with baseline serum magnesium <0.74 mmol/L had serum magnesium ≥0.74 mmol/L at week 26 with canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg versus placebo (74.1% and 80.6% vs 28.8%).

Conclusions
Canagliflozin was associated with normalization of serum magnesium in hypomagnesemic patients with type 2 diabetes, potentially leading to improved cardiometabolic outcomes.
ah, good old 'normal'... i'm sorry but serum mag 0.74 mmol/L is *not* my idea of a suitable cutoff for health. stopping after the first step into a flawed normal range is not helpful. 'potential' improvements indeed...
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Re: drugs to improve nutrient status (because that makes sen

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Mar 13, 2017 8:50 am

COMPARING THE EFFECT OF DULOXETINE WITH GABAPENTIN IN THE TREATMENT OF DIABETIC PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY: A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL
http://en.journals.sid.ir/ViewPaper.aspx?ID=483501
Background: Diabetic neuropathy is the most common micro-vascular complications of diabetes. The drugs including gabapentin and duloxetine are often used for the treatment of pain associated with diabetic neuropathy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of duloxetine and gabapentin in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.
Materials and methods: Totally, 34 patients aged 40 to 70 with diabetic neuropathy were randomly divided into two groups treated with duloxetine and gabapentin and received medical treatment for 45 days. Patients were evaluated for pain before and after treatment using visual analog scale, and also their serum glucose and zinc levels were measured.
Results: In both groups statistically significant reduction in mean blood glucose, pain scale, as well as an increase in serum zinc levels at the end of the study was observed compared to baseline. There was no significant difference between the two groups for the mean decrease in blood sugar, but the increase in duloxetine group showed significant improvement compared to gabapentin in increase serum zinc levels and reducing pain.
Conclusion: The use of duloxetine in patients with diabetic neuropathic pain is more effective than gabapentin because duloxetine causes a better increase in the serum zinc. Due to the high price of duloxetine in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, gabapentin administration can be recommended during the first phase of disease and duloxetine can be used in poor and/or insufficient response.
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Re: drugs to improve nutrient status (because that makes sen

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Mar 13, 2017 9:55 am

Nonenzymatic antioxidants of blood in multiple sclerosis
https://link.springer.com/article/10.10 ... 4150050399
Abstract
Free radical action has been suggested as a causal factor in multiple sclerosis. We investigated the plasma level of lipid peroxides expressed in terms of malone dialdehyde and changes in blood nonenzymatic antioxidants (glutathione, α-tocopherol, retinol, plasma sulfhydryl groups, and uric acid) in multiple sclerosis patients with exacerbation or in remission, including a group treated with β-interferon. The malone dialdehyde level was increased by 38% (n.s.) during exacerbations. The blood concentration of oxidized glutathione was likewise elevated (P < 0.05), while the ratio of plasma α-tocopherol to cholesterol plus triglyceride was decreased (P < 0.001). These changes suggest increased free radical production and consumption of the scavenger molecules during the active phase of the disease. Blood reduced glutathione level was increased (P < 0.01) during exacerbation and remission as well. The rise in this thiol is likely to be a compensatory mechanism defending the cells from further oxidant injuries. β-Interferon increased plasma α-tocopherol levels (P < 0.001) but not the lipid corrected α-tocopherol value. Other parameters were not influenced by the drug.
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Re: drugs to improve nutrient status (because that makes sen

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Mar 13, 2017 10:04 am

Fat-soluble vitamins as disease modulators in multiple sclerosis (2013)
full text pdf http://bit.ly/2nmpkRx
Observational studies – Jime´nez-Jime´nez et al. (57) compared cerebrospinal fluid and serum levels of vitamin E in 36 patients with MS and 32 matched controls. They found that the serum levels of vitamin E and the serum vitamin E/cholesterol ratio were significantly lower in patients with MS than controls (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). The values were, however, not correlated with age, age at onset and duration of the disease in the patients group. Besler et al. (19) replicated these findings and found that vitamin E levels were lower in 24 patients with MS than in 24 controls (P < 0.05).
The findings were also replicated by Salemi et al. (58). They described lower levels of vitamin E (P = 0.001) in 40 patients with MS than in 80 healthy controls. It has also been reported that the ratio of plasma vitamin E to cholesterol and triglyceride are decreased (P < 0.001) during MS exacerbations and increased during treatment with b-interferon (59). In a follow-up study, 14 patients with relapsing-remitting MS were followed during 6 months with interferon-b treatment (60). It was reported that erythrocyte vitamin E level was reduced (P < 0.001) before treatment, but had regained the same level as in controls after 6 months of interferon therapy.[/b] The authors concluded that interferon treatment seemed to exert a sparing effect toward the erythrocyte vitamin E content (60).
Clinical trials – No uncontrolled or controlled clinical trials have been published on how vitamin E supplementation may influence the disease course of MS.
well at least we know that when they do get around to implementing such trials, that dietary sources should be emphasized and that both form and dose of any vit e supplements should be done with careful attention to natural ratios of alpha tocopherols to the other components of the E8 tocopherol and tocotrienol complex. don't need another SELECT fiasco.
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Re: drugs to improve nutrient status (because that makes sen

Post by jimmylegs » Wed Aug 16, 2017 3:15 am

Elevated serum magnesium associated with SGLT2 inhibitor use in type 2 diabetes patients: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27628105
"RESULTS:
Eighteen eligible RCTs, including 15,309 patients and four SGLT2 inhibitors (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, empagliflozin and ipragliflozin) were evaluated. In patients without chronic kidney disease, each SGLT2 inhibitor significantly increased serum magnesium levels compared with placebo (canagliflozin: WMD 0.06 mmol/l for 100 mg and 0.09 mmol/l for 300 mg; dapagliflozin: WMD 0.1 mmol/l for 10 mg; empagliflozin: WMD 0.04 mmol/l for 10 mg and 0.07 mmol/l for 25 mg; and ipragliflozin: WMD 0.05 mmol/l for 50 mg). Canagliflozin increased serum magnesium in a linear dose-dependent manner (p = 0.10). Serum phosphate was significantly increased by dapagliflozin. Serum sodium appeared to significantly differ by SGLT2 inhibitor type. No significant changes in serum calcium and potassium were observed. Findings were robust after including trials involving patients with chronic kidney disease.
CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION:
SGLT2 inhibitors marginally increased serum magnesium levels in type 2 diabetes patients indicating a drug class effect. Further investigations are required to examine the clinical significance of elevated magnesium levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes."
pretty sure we have a good stack of those investigations kicking around in the literature already, but by all means let's get started on dismantling that brutal 'normal' range.

feed farmers, not pharma. eat your magnesium.
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Re: drugs to improve nutrient status (because that makes sen

Post by jimmylegs » Sat Nov 25, 2017 2:04 pm

hot off the presses!

you don't need to bother with making sure low zinc is not the reason behind your low uric acid levels. no, you can just take interferon!

somebody's laughing all the way to the bank

without digging into full text, wonder how they made sure the patients had done *nothing* for themselves besides taking ifn during the treatment period...

you know what is not mentioned once though, after a quick search? ZINC. ffs.

Higher Serum Uric Acid Levels in Multiple Sclerosis Patients After Longterm Interferon Beta Treatment (2017)
https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/sjecr. ... 6-0052.xml
fft https://www.degruyter.com/downloadpdf/j ... 6-0052.pdf

Abstract

Interferon beta is a safe and efficacious treatment for relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). However, there is some evidence that uric acid, a scavenger of peroxynitrite, is involved in MS pathology and that increasing serum uric acid levels might have beneficial therapeutic effects. The aim of this study is to investigate serum uric acid levels in MS patients before and after long-term interferon beta treatment. Blood samples from 101 MS patients (53 receiving interferon beta 1a treatment and 48 receiving interferon beta 1b treatment; 28 male and 73 female; mean age at treatment onset 32,4±7,3 years; mean duration of disease at treatment onset 5,1±3,2 years; mean EDSS 2±1,3) before and after interferon beta treatment (mean treatment duration 3±2 years) were analysed. Serum uric acid levels were measured using a quantitative enzymatic assay (Elitech Diagnostic, Sees, France). MS patients had significantly increased serum uric acid levels after treatment compared with those at the beginning of treatment (272,31±78,21 μmol/l vs. 210,17±53,65 μmol/l; p=0,019, Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney U-test). We did not find significant differences in serum uric acid levels between the interferon beta 1a and interferon beta 1b groups (p=0.98). These results indicate that one of the beneficial effects of interferon beta in MS might be based on the elevation of serum uric acid levels as a natural scavenger of peroxynitrite.
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Re: drugs to improve nutrient status (because that makes sen

Post by NHE » Sat Nov 25, 2017 2:50 pm

jimmylegs wrote:hot off the presses!

you don't need to bother with making sure low zinc is not the reason behind your low uric acid levels. no, you can just take interferon!

somebody's laughing all the way to the bank

without digging into full text, wonder how they made sure the patients had done *nothing* for themselves besides taking ifn during the treatment period...

you know what is not mentioned once though, after a quick search? ZINC. ffs.

Higher Serum Uric Acid Levels in Multiple Sclerosis Patients After Longterm Interferon Beta Treatment
Here's a little discussed factoid about Ifn-beta...
NHE wrote:
gibbledygook wrote:Interferon beta-1b use increased interferon gamma-secreting cell counts
What... :?: :?: :?: The very drug that's prescribed to us to help "modify" the disease is increasing the cell type responsible for the secretion of a cytokine which makes MS WORSE? No wonder Cochrane Reviews and the like have found no long term benefit of DMDs. This is ludicrous :!: I can smell a class action lawsuit brewing on the horizon.


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Re: drugs to improve nutrient status (because that makes sense)

Post by jimmylegs » Thu Mar 05, 2020 5:06 am

PIXE analysis of blood serum of breast cancer patients undergoing successive chemotherapy (2019)
https://link.springer.com/article/10.10 ... 19-06988-7

"...The increased levels of Ca, Cr, Fe and Cu and diminished levels of Ti, Zn, and Se observed in BCPs prior to therapy, were restored to near normal levels after the fifth cycle of chemotherapy. This work elicits a unique possibility of identifying novel trace element based anti-tumour drugs for breast cancer."

smh
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Re: drugs to improve nutrient status (because that makes sense)

Post by jimmylegs » Wed Jan 05, 2022 1:30 pm

The IFN-β 1b effect on Cu Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) in peripheral mononuclear blood cells of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and in neuroblastoma SK-N-BE cells (2015)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 3015300277

Highlights
•SOD1 in CSF and in PBMC of RR-MS patients is reduced compared to control subjects.
•IFN β 1b therapy causes an increase of intracellular SOD1 and mRNA levels in PBMC.
•IFN β 1b treatment of SK-N-BE cells increases intra and extracellular SOD1 levels.

and on that note (jus sayin)

Evaluation of Serum Trace Element Levels and Superoxide Dismutase Activity in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Translating Basic Research into Clinical Application (2016)
https://link.springer.com/article/10.10 ... 016-0891-0

"... Decreased levels of zinc and SOD activity are associated with increased inflammatory processes indicating inappropriate antioxidant system in patients with IBD. ..."
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