hunter gatherer diets

A board to discuss various diet-centered approaches to treating or controlling Multiple Sclerosis, e.g., the Swank Diet
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jimmylegs
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hunter gatherer diets

Post by jimmylegs » Fri Apr 06, 2018 3:33 pm

just enjoying this article and associated graphic right now:

How to Really Eat Like a Hunter-Gatherer...
https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... eally-eat/

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take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

ElliotB
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Re: hunter gatherer diets

Post by ElliotB » Sat Apr 07, 2018 3:39 am

Interesting article! Thanks for posting it!!! National Geographic recently published something along similar lines titled "The Evolution of Diet"

The findings are similar to what Jimmylegs posted.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/food ... n-of-diet/

"So far studies of foragers like the Tsimane, Arctic Inuit, and Hadza have found that these peoples traditionally didn’t develop high blood pressure, atherosclerosis, or cardiovascular disease. “A lot of people believe there is a discordance between what we eat today and what our ancestors evolved to eat,” says paleoanthropologist Peter Ungar of the University of Arkansas. The notion that we’re trapped in Stone Age bodies in a fast-food world is driving the current craze for Paleolithic diets. The popularity of these so-called caveman or Stone Age diets is based on the idea that modern humans evolved to eat the way hunter-gatherers did during the Paleolithic—the period from about 2.6 million years ago to the start of the agricultural revolution—and that our genes haven’t had enough time to adapt to farmed foods.

A Stone Age diet “is the one and only diet that ideally fits our genetic makeup,” writes Loren Cordain, an evolutionary nutritionist at Colorado State University, in his book The Paleo Diet: Lose Weight and Get Healthy by Eating the Foods You Were Designed to Eat. After studying the diets of living hunter-gatherers and concluding that 73 percent of these societies derived more than half their calories from meat, Cordain came up with his own Paleo prescription: Eat plenty of lean meat and fish but not dairy products, beans, or cereal grains—foods introduced into our diet after the invention of cooking and agriculture. Paleo-diet advocates like Cordain say that if we stick to the foods our hunter-gatherer ancestors once ate, we can avoid the diseases of civilization, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, even acne."

Since the Inuit are at such a high latitude on the planet and eat a diet consisting primarily of (fatty) meats (both thought to be major causes of MS by many 'experts') and as they and have no incidence of MS, wouldn't it make sense to follow their diet and live like they do? (FWIW, it makes sense to me so I do!) BUT keep in mind that they only consume grass fed meats and wild caught seafood and like them, humans likely should probably not consume grains or meats from grain fed animals.

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Re: hunter gatherer diets

Post by jimmylegs » Sat Apr 07, 2018 6:49 am

havent read the details from nat geo (for that matter didn't make time for 100% of the scientific american contribution either) but worth checking out i think, for the sake of the broader perspective. from the sounds of it scientific american is not as in love with the paleo concept as the nat geo report seems to be
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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