Diet & MS Research

A board to discuss various diet-centered approaches to treating or controlling Multiple Sclerosis, e.g., the Swank Diet
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2018 studies: enjoy your pro-inflammatory diet, MS-ers???

Post by jimmylegs » Fri Sep 21, 2018 11:11 am

Interactions between dietary inflammatory index, nutritional state and Multiple Sclerosis clinical condition (2018)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 7718302845

Summary
"Background & aims:
The Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) consists of a tool that assesses dietary inflammatory potential based on the assignment of an inflammatory score to a variety of nutrients, seasonings and bioactive compounds. Pro-inflammatory diets are associated to weight and abdominal fat excess. High Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist Circumference (WC) seem to contribute to a worse prognosis in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients. Therefore, this study seeks to investigate the relation between anthropometric indexes and body adiposity with the clinical condition and the Dietary Inflammatory Index of MS individuals.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional, analytical study that included 137 MS patients residing in the Brazilian northeast. Through a structured questionnaire and medical records consultation, we collected data on demographics, nutritional state, arterial pressure, clinical and dietary variables. Clinical variables included the MS type, number of pulse therapies and attack rate in the last two years, number of days of most recent pulse therapy and muscular strength assessment scores (MRC) and most recent disability level (EDSS). The nutritional state was evaluated based on BMI, WC, waist-hip ratio (WHR), Body Roundness Index (BRI), Body Shape z score Index (ABSIz) and body fat percentage (%BF). The DII was calculated according to a validated methodology.

Results: The ABSIz presented a positive correlation with regards to the EDSS score (r = 0.294. p = 0.001). WC and WHR presented a negative correlation in relation to the number of pulse therapy days (r = −0.255. p = 0.022 and r = −0.251. p = 0.024). BMI and %BF were not correlated to clinical variables (p > 0.05). The DII was positively correlated to the BMI in people with progressive MS (r = 0.556. p = 0.025).

Conclusions: The DII may interfere in the nutritional state of MS patients and the nutritional state may affect disability levels but it is necessary to establish which nutritional indicator can better predict the relation between DII and the clinical condition of MS patients."

Dietary Inflammatory Index and clinical course of multiple sclerosis (2018)
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41430-018-0294-8

Abstract
"Objectives:
This study aims at analyzing the association between the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) and the clinical condition of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients.

Methods: It is a quantitative, cross-sectional analytical study that included 137 MS patients assisted at a reference center for MS treatment in the Brazilian northeast. Data was collated through a structured questionnaire and medical records consultation, also involving demographic, clinical, and nutritional variables. Clinical variables included the MS type, diagnosis and follow-up start dates, investigation of recent urinary tract symptoms, use of immunomodulatory, vitamin D supplementation, number of recent pulse therapies, relapse rate in the last 2 years, muscular strength assessment (MRC), disability degree (EDSS), and a gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in the central white matter (CWM). The DII was calculated according to the Shivappa et al. methodology.

Results: There was no difference in any of the variables according to the DII (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: The Dietary Inflammatory Index did not affect the clinical condition of individuals with multiple sclerosis."

i'm not getting clarity from these so far :S will likely be interesting to dig into Shivappa et al.'s methodology and if possible, compare to local resources.
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2000 review: Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption

Post by jimmylegs » Wed Nov 07, 2018 11:18 am

Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption (2000)
https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/130/5/1378S/4686381

"ABSTRACT
Marginal zinc deficiency and suboptimal zinc status have been recognized in many groups of the population in both less developed and industrialized countries. Although the cause in some cases may be inadequate dietary intake of zinc, inhibitors of zinc absorption are most likely the most common causative factor.

Phytate, which is present in staple foods like cereals, corn and rice, has a strong negative effect on zinc absorption from composite meals. Inositol hexaphosphates and pentaphosphates are the phytate forms that exert these negative effects, whereas the lower phosphates have no or little effect on zinc absorption. The removal or reduction of phytate by enzyme (phytase) treatment, precipitation methods, germination, fermentation or plant breeding/genetic engineering markedly improves zinc absorption.

Iron can have a negative effect on zinc absorption, if given together in a supplement, whereas no effect is observed when the same amounts are present in a meal as fortificants.

Cadmium, which is increasing in the environment, also inhibits zinc absorption.

The amount of protein in a meal has a positive effect on zinc absorption, but individual proteins may act differently; e.g., casein has a modest inhibitory effect on zinc absorption compared with other protein sources.

Amino acids, such as histidine and methionine, and other low-molecular-weight ions, such as EDTA and organic acids (e.g., citrate), are known to have a positive effect on zinc absorption and have been used for zinc supplements. Knowledge about dietary factors that inhibit zinc absorption and about ways to overcome or remove these factors is essential when designing strategies to improve the zinc nutrition of vulnerable groups."
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Re: 2000 review: Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption

Post by NHE » Thu Nov 08, 2018 2:34 am

jimmylegs wrote:Amino acids, such as histidine and methionine, and other low-molecular-weight ions, such as EDTA and organic acids (e.g., citrate), are known to have a positive effect on zinc absorption and have been used for zinc supplements.
EDTA is a chelator that readily binds divalent cations such as zinc, magnesium and calcium and increases their excretion. The study linked below found a 30x increase in the urinary excretion of zinc following EDTA treatment.

http://www.chelationmedicalcenter.com/! ... herapy.pdf

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Re: 2000 review: Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption

Post by jimmylegs » Thu Nov 08, 2018 2:06 pm

without spending the time to dig, ('chelationmedicalcenter.com' is not my kind of resource for academia) i imagine the comparison may be apples and oranges; the quantities referred to in the separate cases not identical.
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Re: 2000 review: Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption

Post by NHE » Fri Nov 09, 2018 3:11 am

jimmylegs wrote:without spending the time to dig, ('chelationmedicalcenter.com' is not my kind of resource for academia) i imagine the comparison may be apples and oranges; the quantities referred to in the separate cases not identical.
It's a link to a copy of a peer reviewed published paper. Did you even bother to click on the link? Even the paper you linked to raised several issues with EDTA.
Bo Lönnerdal, 2000 wrote:However, this positive effect is not always observed, and in some cases a negative effect on zinc absorption has been noted. It was realized that the ratio of EDTA to inhibitors such as phytate and other cations competing for complex formation, such as Ca2+, Mg2+ and Fe2+, was critical when it comes to the effect being positive or negative. It has subsequently been found that the Zn-EDTA complex is transported intact from the lumen into the enterocyte but not across the basolateral membrane (Hempe and Cousins 1989).
In effect, Zn-EDTA doesn' get into the bloodstream.
Bo Lönnerdal, 2000 wrote: The fact that no Zn-EDTA complex could be detected in plasma supported this notion and was further in agreement with findings by O'Dell (1969) that parenteral EDTA administration increases zinc excretion and that Zn-EDTA in blood is not utilizable.
Zn-EDTA is NOT utilizable!
Bo Lönnerdal, 2000 wrote:It is evident that the interaction between EDTA and zinc as well as other cations and other low-molecular-weight chelators (Desrosiers and Clydesdale, 1989) and its consequences for metal ion transport warrant further studies.
Yes, more study is needed! :idea: The paper cited did NOT even examine EDTA despite what the implications are of the use of the reference! :roll:

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Re: 2000 review: Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption

Post by jimmylegs » Fri Nov 09, 2018 3:49 am

nope. no comment on quantities i guess?
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Re: 2000 review: Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption

Post by ElliotB » Fri Nov 09, 2018 3:22 pm

Happened to see this and thought it might be appropriate to add here. I never knew Zinc was so important:


Autism Linked to Zinc Deficiency in Childhood

https://www.newsweek.com/autism-linked- ... od-1209635

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Re: 2000 review: Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption

Post by jimmylegs » Sat Nov 10, 2018 3:31 am

if interested, prasad is a go-to author for reading re zinc as an essential nutrient.
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2009: Zinc Fertilization Plus Liming to Reduce Cadmium

Post by jimmylegs » Sat Nov 24, 2018 7:59 am

with romaine in the news lately, i ran a search and landed on this

Zinc Fertilization Plus Liming to Reduce Cadmium Uptake by Romaine Lettuce on Cd-Mineralized Lockwood Soil (2009)

"Lockwood shaly loam (Pachic Argixerolls) and similar Cd mineralized soils derived from marine shale in California contain higher Cd levels and higher Cd:Zn ratios than uncontaminated US soils, and produce leafy vegetables with considerably higher Cd than is normal for US lettuce. Previous work by Burau et al. suggested that, in contrast with geogenic Zn+Cd enriched soils, liming the Cd-mineralized soils did not effectively reduce crop Cd concentration. Our previous studies found for high Cd:Zn soils, liming may not reduce crop Cd but liming plus Zn fertilizer can strongly reduce crop Cd. Greenhouse pot trials were undertaken with addition of 0-500 mg Zn kg-1 to Lockwood soil (5.3 mg Cd and 54 mg Zn kg-1). All pots were made calcareous with reagent CaCO3 (harvest pHW 7.8 ), or adjusted to a range of pH without Zn fertilizer. The zero Zn calcareous treatment produced lettuce with 13.2 mg Cd kg-1 DW and only 10.5 mg Zn kg 1 DW; adding 100 mg Zn kg-1 soil produced lettuce containing 2.53 mg Cd kg-1 and 35 mg Zn kg-1; adding 250 mg Zn kg-1, 6.3 mg Cd kg-1 lettuce; and 500 mg Zn kg-1, 3.9 mg Cd kg-1 lettuce. For the 0 Zn treatment, acidification or liming increased lettuce Cd. The key finding is that if Zn is added to raise Cd:Zn ratio, liming these soils can be highly effective in reducing lettuce Cd, much like found for other Cd+Zn enriched soils."

not news to me re the cd uptake in nutrient depleted soil conditions, but i think it was magnesium i had on the radar not zn. (though i have read about soil zinc depletion issues in other crop contexts before). i am trying to work through the challenges where organic produce is concerned, since i know there's less cadmium uptake there as well.

i already gave up california produce to a large extent after seeing the aquifer depletion maps and absorbing some thinking about vegetable shipments around the continent amounting to exporting already scarce water all over the place. the particular cadmium dynamic is worth knowing.
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2011 study: Nutrient Rich vs “Go,” “Slow,” and “Whoa” Foods

Post by jimmylegs » Tue Dec 11, 2018 1:51 pm

Comparing the Nutrient Rich Foods Index with “Go,” “Slow,” and “Whoa” Foods (2011)

Abstract
The US National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has grouped foods and beverages into three classes: “Go,” “Slow,” and “Whoa,” as part of a children's guide to eating right. Using nutrient composition data in the 2004 Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies, this descriptive study compared the Go, Slow, and Whoa food classes to tertiles of food rankings generated by the Nutrient Rich Foods Index. A total of 1,045 foods and beverages were first assigned into Go, Slow, and Whoa classes and then ranked by the Nutrient Rich Foods Index nutrient profile model. The Nutrient Rich Foods Index model was based on nine nutrients to encourage: protein, fiber, vitamins A, C, and E, calcium, iron, magnesium, and potassium; and on three nutrients to limit: saturated fat, added sugar, and sodium, all calculated per 100 calories. Both the Go, Slow, and Whoa and the Nutrient Rich Foods Index models readily distinguished between energy-dense and nutrient-rich beverages and foods, and the three Go, Slow, and Whoa classes closely corresponded to tertiles of Nutrient Rich Foods Index scores. There were some disagreements in the class assignment of fortified cereals, some dairy products, and diet beverages. Unlike the Go, Slow, and Whoa model, the Nutrient Rich Foods Index model produced continuous scores that could be used to rank foods within a given class. The study provides an illustration of how diverse nutrient profiling systems can be used to identify healthful foods and beverages.
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Re: 2000 review: Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption

Post by Jaded » Fri Dec 14, 2018 2:07 am

I've been taking 50mg of zinc citrate for years and have recently been wondering how I can improve my immune system. I didn't consider that absorption might be a factor.

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Re: 2000 review: Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption

Post by jimmylegs » Fri Dec 14, 2018 6:24 am

hi jaded i recently picked up zinc picolinate which is better absorbed than citrate per available literature. i had found that my serum zinc levels weren't where i wanted them when using a supplement product i had started after my preferred local shop closed down.

zinc picolinate is more expensive so it's one of three diff zinc products in the current rotation. one is plain zinc citrate which has worked for me in the past. the last is l opti zinc which was not really keeping my levels where i wanted them, but contains some copper -and also i am using it up rather than wasting the remaining capsules. in the long term using all this zinc i found i had to switch to a multi which contained some iron, to help keep my energy levels up.

some of my long term strategies for maximizing zinc absorption include limiting sugar, dairy, gluten, phytate, and alcohol. i learned years ago that chucking entire categories of foods based on one perceived fault was dangerous and i don't do it any more.

for one example of many, my typical bread intake amounts to 2-3 small slices of toast a week at breakfast time. less often sourdough (ie fermentation), more often a sprouted flour (ie germination) 12 grain rye.
no matter what there is also protein in the equation. eg an egg if it's the weekend, nut butter if it's the midweek break from oats and berries.
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Re: 2000 review: Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption

Post by Jaded » Sat Dec 15, 2018 4:17 am

Hi jl
I bought some zinc picolinate for something (can't remember what) so going to take that from now.

Also I will take my supps a little while after breakfast and not straight away so hoping this will help.

I'm doing the OMS diet now so no eggs, sadly. Breakfast is usually porridge with fruit or toast with almond butter and banana.

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Re: 2000 review: Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption

Post by jimmylegs » Sat Dec 15, 2018 11:31 am

hey there :) if you notice any nausea with the new timing, try taking the zinc with a suitable snack option.
take control of your own health
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Re: 2000 review: Dietary Factors Influencing Zinc Absorption

Post by Jaded » Sat Dec 15, 2018 2:41 pm

Ok great - thanks, I shall remember that

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