NEW Cheap Non-Military Exo-Skeleton - Kickstarter

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CureOrBust
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NEW Cheap Non-Military Exo-Skeleton - Kickstarter

Post by CureOrBust »

This came up recently in my YouTube suggestions, and if it is half as real as they make out, Im impressed.

Its a kickstarter, so I dont know when you would get one.

I think the RRP is set at $599USD, which I think is MUCH less than a Bioness for foot drop. The "Early Bird" is USD $299 (or AUD $458) for base "GO" model.

Hypershell Practical Test


(The following is a liitle unscientific)
Hypershell Exoskeleton Review with Sami Luo


ALL Videos
https://www.youtube.com/@Hypershell_Tech/videos

KickStarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/hy ... 16VXdPVGc9

Indegogo: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/hype ... 20230519#/

Im sure they have worked or will work out the details in their "AI". But One of my concerns is that if I stand too long, my knees slowly collapse, so maybe the device would think I am trying to sit, and stop helping me stand.
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Scott1
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Re: NEW Cheap Non-Military Exo-Skeleton - Kickstarter

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I can see what it's doing, but a lot of MS walking problems relate to dorsiflexion (the ability to lift the front o your foot so you don't trip). That depends on a muscle called tibialis anterior being able to contract and its antagonist, tibialis posterior relaxing). Additionally, you need your calf being able to pump properly (that's the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles), and your toes need to be able bend so you can push off with each step ( that's flexor digotorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and flexor hallicus longus).
Every muscle I have mentioned is below the knee but this device is above the knee. All its doing is contracting the three muscles that start at the hip and run down the side of the knee, ending just below the knee (semitendinosus, gracilis and sartorius. By squeezing them it has the effect of shortening them and that makes the knee flex and pulls the lower leg back slightly. You would need a perfectly functional leg action, or minimal loss of function, to be able to use that. If you have trouble walking already, I imagine it would be very difficult to control.
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Re: NEW Cheap Non-Military Exo-Skeleton - Kickstarter

Post by CureOrBust »

If it lifts your leg high, from above the knee (NB: The motor arm attaches just above the knee), then the dorsiflextion of your ankle isn't so much an issue, as your foot is lifted high above the ground.

I know it isnt targeted specifically for MS, but as the day goes on, I personally find it harder and harder to lift my lower leg (ie my heel, not jut my toe) off the ground to step over obstacles, which is exactly what this would help with. The testers joke how they feel it kicks their legs in the air. And in the early stages of the day, its lifting action would reduce the fatigue on lifting your leg, as the day progresses.

AND its cheap compared to bioness type devices. I also see an opportunity for future dev specific for MS, or different "AI" programs to target specific deficiencies. eg one leg weaker than the other. Maybe someone like bioness will make similar, and add an ankle stimulant.
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Scott1
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Re: NEW Cheap Non-Military Exo-Skeleton - Kickstarter

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It will depend on how your leg operates without it. If you imagine just the bones of your leg and look at where they meet behind the kneecap , you would see both the tibia (lower leg) and the femur (upper leg) have two bumpy bits on the end. They aren't symmetrical and are slightly offset. So when you straighten your leg one bone has to slightly (only a few degrees) rotate to slide into position to lock the knee. Which bone turns depends on where your foot is. If it is against a surface that won't move ( closed position) the top bone rotates. If it is 'in the air' and there is little or no resistance (open position) under the foot the lower bone rotates to lock the knee. The issue with this device is it doesn't make the muscles of the lower leg rotate the relevant bone. Walking downstairs would be a nightmare wearing this as the leg would be in an open position as you lower it and there is no guarantee that it would mean the foot ends up in the right position or the knee has locked to bear the weight transfer.
If you can't lift your heel, I'd Botox the soleus and the tibialis posterior. If you do that and then sit in a chair, nothing will improve. You would need to go through an intensive range of exercises to lengthen and strengthen all the muscles affected by the tibial nerve. (popletius, gastronemius, flexor digitorum longus, flexor hallicus longus, flexor digitorum brevis, and soleus.) Only an expert (hard to find) would be able to tell if the peroneal nerve is also involved.
Have you tried Botox, or dry needling, with an exercise regime?
Regards,
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Re: NEW Cheap Non-Military Exo-Skeleton - Kickstarter

Post by NHE »

CureOrBust wrote: Tue Nov 28, 2023 2:58 pm I know it isnt targeted specifically for MS, but as the day goes on, I personally find it harder and harder to lift my lower leg (ie my heel, not jut my toe) off the ground to step over obstacles, which is exactly what this would help with. The testers joke how they feel it kicks their legs in the air. And in the early stages of the day, its lifting action would reduce the fatigue on lifting your leg, as the day progresses.
Do you think the Ossur FootUp could help you? By providing assistance with dorsiflexion, you might not have to lift your legs so high.

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Re: NEW Cheap Non-Military Exo-Skeleton - Kickstarter

Post by CureOrBust »

I think my problem is lifting my whole leg off the ground. That unit appears more for the lower leg/dorsiflexion. Footdrop is not my major issue.

Lifting my leg involves the upper leg and hip muscles muscles. It may help some, but I think the exo-skeleton would help a lot more. As I said, the users talk about how they feel it kicks/picks up their whole leg up.

Although I do like how cheap it is. I found on eBay 1 unit costs $AUD188. Maybe there is a location near me that would allow a test run.
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Re: NEW Cheap Non-Military Exo-Skeleton - Kickstarter

Post by CureOrBust »

Actually, just stumbled across the following. I wont give the AUS link, Im sure if you search ebay in your country you will get similar links. Search for "Power Spring Knee Pads brace Leg Support Rebound Lift Stabilizer Joint Knee Pads", Although its for pressure on the knee, I think it would take at least some weight off my legs/knee angle. And at only <$AUD20, it would probably cost near that in fuel/oil/tire/km to drive somewhere to try it out. The springs look pretty weak.

Image

Of course, the thing to remember is, you get what you pay for. Those springs don't look too much heftier than a clothes peg...
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Re: NEW Cheap Non-Military Exo-Skeleton - Kickstarter

Post by Scott1 »

Hi,
I definitely think you should try before you buy. Lifting your whole leg off the ground depends on a range of things. Not least is how strong you are on the standing leg.
Your leg action really starts up in your torso. When your psoas contracts it acts like a pulley, then your iliacus muscles (the hip flexors) need to join in. On your standing leg the same muscles need to stabilise you so you don't wobble and fall over.
After that, a whole range of muscles need to kick in to ensure that the ball of your femur is sitting in it's socket and the knee can both disengage and then lock when it's appropriate.
You definitely need to dorsiflex then strike your heel first when you put your foot down. You then need to roll through the foot so the first joint of your big toe takes the weight (not walk on the outside of your foot). If you can't land the big toe properly, your glutes won't get the appropriate signal to slightly flex your pelvis through internal and external rotation.

If your foot is not clearing the ground and you're hitching your hip to get the leg to swing then your pelvis is probably in a lateral tilt and your hamstrings will feel tight (even if they're not). If you have been compromised for a while, you may also have an anterior tilt and that can also make the hamstrings feel tight.

I don't feel these devices address any of those things. Nonetheless, they may work for you, but I doubt they are appropriate for most people with CNS related muscle stiffness.
Try before you buy.
Regards,
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