Lipoic acid inhibits B cell migration across BBB in RRMS

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NHE
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Lipoic acid inhibits B cell migration across BBB in RRMS

Post by NHE » Sun Sep 02, 2018 12:03 am

Effects of lipoic acid on migration of human B cells and monocyte-enriched peripheral blood mononuclear cells in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.
J Neuroimmunol. 2018 Feb 15;315:24-27.
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system characterized by inflammation and demyelination resulting in clinical disability. The rodent MS model suggests that infiltration of monocytes and B cells contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we compared the migratory capacity of human monocytes and B cells from healthy control (HC) and relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) subjects, with or without lipoic acid (LA) treatment. Basal migration of monocyte-enriched PBMCs from RRMS subjects is significantly higher than HC PBMCs. LA treatment significantly inhibits monocyte and B cell migration in both cohorts, and may thus be therapeutically effective for treatment of MS.

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Petr75
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Re: Lipoic acid inhibits B cell migration across BBB in RRMS

Post by Petr75 » Mon Sep 03, 2018 8:09 am

2010 Feb 11
Pharmacokinetic study of lipoic acid in multiple sclerosis: Comparing mice and human pharmacokinetic parameters
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3489916/

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2015 Nov 11
Lipoic Acid Reduces Inflammation in a Mouse Focal Cortical EAE
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4664888/

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18/04/16
Lipoic acid may provide 'inexpensive' MS treatment
https://www.ms-uk.org/apr18

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ECTRIMS2016 – Antioxidant Lipoic Acid Appears to Slow SPMS Patients’ Neurodegeneration
https://multiplesclerosisnewstoday.com/ ... generation

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03.07.2017
Lipoic acid outperformed ocrelizumab
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318225.php

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2018 Jul
Lipoic Acid Stimulates cAMP Production in Healthy Control and Secondary Progressive MS Subjects
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29143287

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https://ereska.net/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=237&start=60

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Petr75
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Re: Lipoic acid inhibits B cell migration across BBB in RRMS

Post by Petr75 » Tue Jun 11, 2019 7:57 am

2019 May 6
Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, Portland
Lipoic Acid and Other Antioxidants as Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31056714

Abstract
Oxidative stress (OS), when oxidative forces outweigh endogenous and nutritional antioxidant defenses, contributes to the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Evidence of OS is found during acute relapses, in active inflammatory lesions, and in chronic, longstanding plaques. OS results in both ongoing inflammation and neurodegeneration. Antioxidant therapies are a rational strategy for people with MS with all phenotypes and disease durations. PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To understand the function of OS in health and disease, to examine the contributions of OS to MS pathophysiology, and to review current evidence for the effects of selected antioxidant therapies in people with MS (PwMS) with a focus on lipoic acid (LA). RECENT FINDINGS: Studies of antioxidant interventions in both animal and in vivo models result in reductions in serum markers of OS and increases in levels and activity of antioxidant enzymes. Antioxidant trials in PwMS, while generally underpowered, detect short-term improvements in markers of OS and antioxidant defenses, and to a lesser extent, in clinical symptoms (fatigue, depression). The best evidence to date is a 2-year trial of LA in secondary progressive MS which demonstrated a significant reduction of whole-brain atrophy and trend toward improvement in walking speed. Antioxidant therapy is a promising approach to treat MS across the spectrum and duration of disease. Rigorous and well-powered trials are needed to determine their therapeutic benefits.

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